curate's egg

(redirected from curate's eggs)

cu·rate's egg

 (kyo͝or′ĭts)
n. Chiefly British
Something with both good and bad qualities.

[From a cartoon published in the British humor magazine Punch in 1895 about a curate who, having been served a bad egg by his bishop, said that parts of it were excellent.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

curate's egg

n
something that has both good and bad parts
[C20: derived from a cartoon in Punch (November, 1895) in which a timid curate, who has been served a bad egg while breakfasting with his bishop, says that parts of the egg are excellent]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cu′rate's egg′


n.
something of mixed quality.
[after a cartoon by German. du Maurier in the English weekly Punch (Nov. 9, 1895): a meek curate, when served a bad egg at the bishop's table, replies that “parts of it are excellent”]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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The Saddlers have secured two away draws so far under Smith and while both performances, at Tranmere and Bristol Rovers, were real 'curate's eggs' - some parts good, some parts bad - in both games there was no shortage of spirit from Walsall as they fought back from behind to secure a point.
Up until this point, The Simpsons' entire season DVD collections have been curate's eggs, simply because of the patchy quality of the episodes, and for that reason have been for diehards only.
As you sit there in your workplace fast approaching a ceiling that may or may not be made from glass, your hundreds of thousands of eggs are rapidly dying, going a bit iffy, turning into curate's eggs. Scientists used to think we were okay until we hit 30 when the quality and quantity of our eggs goes into decline but apparently this now begins at 27.