curatorial


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cu·ra·tor

 (kyo͝o-rā′tər, kyo͝or′ə-tər)
n.
1. One who manages or oversees, as the administrative director of a museum collection or a library.
2. One who gathers something, organizes it, and makes it available to the public: a curator of online resources for gardeners.

[Middle English curatour, legal guardian, from Old French curateur, from Latin cūrātor, overseer, from cūrātus, past participle of cūrāre, to take care of; see curative.]

cu′ra·to′ri·al (kyo͝or′ə-tôr′ē-əl) adj.
cu·ra′tor·ship′ n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.curatorial - of or relating to a curator or the duties of a curator; "curatorial duties"
Translations

curatorial

[ˌkjʊərəˈtɔːrɪəl] ADJ the museum's curatorial staffel equipo de conservadores del museo
curatorial expertiseconocimientos mpl de conservación

curatorial

adj the museum’s curatorial teamdie Kustoden pldes Museums
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References in periodicals archive ?
Representative of the conference's professional development seminars and topic-based sessions, "Past, Present, and Future of Ballet" took stock of a similarly named summit organized a month before by the National Ballet of Canada (see News, Dance Magazine, September, page 23.) The Miami discussion, moderated by NBC's executive director, Valerie Wilder, and including the insights of Boston Ballet's Mikko Nissinen, encouraged horizontal rather than tiered administration, outreach efforts, and a balance of curatorial mission with homegrown choreography.
New locations for the curatorial center, library, and museum administration are planned.
Michael Harris set out with a worthy, though loftily ambitious, project that perhaps might have benefited from more curatorial voices.
Taking the museum model as a starting point, this work provides practical guidelines for freelance or independent curators, as well as other types of curators and curatorial students working in traditional and nontraditional venues.
Perhaps sensing the risks inherent in curatorial micro-management, Hoffmann and Pedrosa invoked the brilliant and universally admired Felix Gonzalez-Torres as curatorial alibi, as a kind of meta-artist whose work wasn't actually in the show--the very name of which, "Untitled (12th Istanbul Biennial), 2011/'conjured his artworks' titles--but rather provided a certain ambience and gossamer thematic framework for the five spaces in which one encountered small-scale works by some hundred international artists said to share his interest in broad topics such as abstraction and history.
or Fiction?; and the annual Discovery Night, where Patrons and guests learn which fascinating curatorial project YPC is financially supporting this year.
These events include a 2-day workshop on Curatorial Concepts & Practices, conducted by eminent curator and art critic Nilofar Farrukh at the National Art Gallery (NAG).
NEW YORK -- Director of The Metropolitan Museum of Art Philippe de Montebello announces the restructuring and reorganizing of the curatorial responsibilities within the newly expanded department, "Nineteenth-Century, Modern and Contemporary Art." The department encompasses European paintings from the 1800s to the present, along with international 20th-century sculpture, drawings, prints, decorative arts and design, allowing the museum to detail the story of modern art in all media, from its beginnings to the present day.
But as has been made explicitly clear by the fate of its permanent collection (now reorganized in a disconnected series of thematic units, AR August 2000), the Tate is determined to challenge the entire notion of conventional art history, with a fashionable curatorial disregard for chronology.
With Philip Johnson acting as curatorial consultant, The Long View, is organized by Terence Riley, chief curator, Peter Reed, curator at the department of architecture and design for the Museum of Modem Art, and Frank E.