curie


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to curie: Curie constant

cu·rie

 (kyo͝or′ē, kyo͝o-rē′)
n. Abbr. Ci
A unit of radioactivity, equal to the amount of radioactive decay of an isotope; equal to 3.7 × 1010 disintegrations per second, or 3.7 × 1010 becquerels. In 1975, the curie was replaced by the becquerel as the standard SI unit of radioactivity.

[After Pierre Curie.]

Curie

(ˈkjʊərɪ; -riː; French kyri)
n
1. (Biography) Marie (mari). 1867–1934, French physicist and chemist, born in Poland: discovered with her husband Pierre the radioactivity of thorium, and discovered and isolated radium and polonium. She shared a Nobel prize for physics (1903) with her husband and Henri Becquerel, and was awarded a Nobel prize for chemistry (1911)
2. (Biography) her husband, Pierre (pjɛr). 1859–1906, French physicist and chemist

curie

(ˈkjʊərɪ; -riː)
n
(Units) a unit of radioactivity that is equal to 3.7 × 1010 disintegrations per second. Symbol: Ci
[C20: named after Pierre Curie]

cu•rie

(ˈkyʊər i, kyʊˈri)

n.
a unit of activity of radioactive substances equivalent to 3.70 x 1010 disintegrations per second. Abbr.: Ci
[1910; after Pierre Curie]

Cu•rie

(ˈkyʊər i, kyʊˈri)

n.
1. Irène, Joliot-Curie.
2. Marie, 1867–1934, Polish physicist and chemist in France: codiscoverer of radium 1898; Nobel prize for physics 1903, for chemistry 1911.
3. her husband, Pierre, 1859–1906, French physicist and chemist: codiscoverer of radium; Nobel prize for physics 1903.

cu·rie

(kyo͝or′ē, kyo͝o-rē′)
A unit used to measure the rate of radioactive decay. Radioactive decay is measured by the rate at which the atoms making up a radioactive substance are transformed into different atoms. One curie is equal to 37 billion (3.7 × 1010) of these transformations per second. Many scientists now measure radioactive decay in becquerels rather than curies.

curie

A unit used to measure the activity of a radioactive substance.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.curie - a unit of radioactivity equal to the amount of a radioactive isotope that decays at the rate of 37,000,000,000 disintegrations per second
radioactivity unit - a measure of radioactivity
millicurie - a unit of radioactivity equal to one thousandth of a curie
2.Curie - French physicist; husband of Marie Curie (1859-1906)
3.curie - French chemist (born in Poland) who won two Nobel prizesCurie - French chemist (born in Poland) who won two Nobel prizes; one (with her husband and Henri Becquerel) for research on radioactivity and another for her discovery of radium and polonium (1867-1934)
Translations

curie

[ˈkjʊərɪ] Ncurie m

curie

n (Phys) → Curie nt
References in classic literature ?
These labours --the first that were attempted in radiography--served to open the way for Monsieur and Madame Curie to the discovery of radium.
Her latest fundraising endeavour was to cut her hair for charity and donate the sponsorship money to Marie Curie. So far, Niamh has raised over PS1,000 for Marie Curie.
"Curie Me Away" is based on Curie's success story, and the NTSEC has invited American theatrical duo Matheatre to Taipei to produce the performance.
Mr Simpson said: "Marie Curie is an exceptional charity that supports thousands of Scots every year who have a terminal illness.
Fiona, who works in a petrol station in Gretna, said: "The Marie Curie Nurses were amazing.
The local Marie Curie fundraising team is keen to get collection can co-ordinators on board to help look after collection cans in shops, newsagents, chemists, pubs and doctors' surgeries and also place collection cans in new locations.
The Great Daffodil Appeal is Marie Curie's biggest fundraising campaign held every March.
Mark and long-term Marie Curie supporter Fay were pictured together with Marie Curie nurses Victoria Shodeko and Victoria Oluwalogbon at a Parliamentary event held this week to celebrate the launch of the Great Daffodil Appeal, Marie Curie's biggest annual fundraising campaign.
The shoes are PS45 from Hotter stores and Hotter.com from March 1 to mark the launch of Marie Curie's Great Daffodil Appeal.
It was the idea of visitor centre manager Martin Cook, after the Marie Curie Caerphilly fundraising froup met to discuss their fundraising plans in August.
Twenty four year old Ruth Christie, who is scared of heights, will fly down the Velocity Zip wire at Bethesda quarry in memory of her aunty and to raise funds for Marie Curie.