curing

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cure

 (kyo͝or)
n.
1.
a. A drug or course of medical treatment used to restore health: discovered a new cure for ulcers.
b. Restoration of health; recovery from disease: the likelihood of cure.
c. Something that corrects or relieves a harmful or disturbing situation: The cats proved to be a good cure for our mouse problem.
2. Ecclesiastical Spiritual charge or care, as of a priest for a congregation.
3. The office or duties of a curate.
4. The act or process of preserving a product.
v. cured, cur·ing, cures
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to be free of a disease or unhealthy condition: medicine that cured the patient of gout.
b. To cause to be free of, to lose interest in, or to stop doing something: a remark that cured me of the illusion that I might be a good singer; a bad reaction that cured him of the desire to smoke cigars; a visit to the dentist that cured her of eating sweets.
2. To eliminate (a disease, for example) from the body by medical or other treatment; cause recovery from: new antibiotics to cure infections.
3. To remove or remedy (something harmful or disturbing): cure a social evil.
4. To preserve (meat, for example), as by salting, smoking, or aging.
5. To prepare, preserve, or finish (a substance) by a chemical or physical process.
6. To vulcanize (rubber).
v.intr.
1. To effect a cure or recovery: a drug that cures without side effects.
2. To be prepared, preserved, or finished by a chemical or physical process: hams curing in the smokehouse.

[Middle English, from Old French, medical treatment, from Latin cūra, from Archaic Latin coisa-.]

cure′less adj.
cur′er n.

cu·ré

 (kyo͝o-rā′, kyo͝or′ā′)
n.
A parish priest, especially in a French-speaking community.

[French, from Old French, from Medieval Latin cūrātus; see curate1.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

curing

(ˈkjʊərɪŋ)
n
(Cookery) the process of preserving food
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
healing, curing - Healing is a process in which an organism's health is restored; curing is a method that promotes healing.
See also related terms for healing.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.curing - the process of becoming hard or solid by cooling or drying or crystallization; "the hardening of concrete"; "he tested the set of the glue"
congealment, congelation - the process of congealing; solidification by (or as if by) freezing
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
plastination - a process involving fixation and dehydration and forced impregnation and hardening of biological tissues; water and lipids are replaced by curable polymers (silicone or epoxy or polyester) that are subsequently hardened; "the plastination of specimens is valuable for research and teaching"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

curing

[ˈkjʊərɪŋ] Ncuración f
see also cure
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Sealant (Transbond XT light cure adhesive primer, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif., USA) was applied on the etched enamel and cured for 10 seconds with LED light (standard mode: 1000 mW/ [cm.sup.2], 390-480 nm, Valo ortho cordless curing light, South Jordan, USA).
The application of a dental curing light to a tooth could therefore contribute to the darkening of bound tetracycline compounds.
Other new topics include maintenance for esthetic restorative materials; curing light information for bulk-fill resin composites; esthetic contouring; immediate dentin sealing; and novel surgical techniques, including lip repositioning in combination with crown lengthening, ridge preservation with collagen membranes, the tunneling technique, connective tissue grafting, and implant-supported full-mouth rehabilitations.
Work documented by Jerri et al.,12 and Ilie13 Moszner et al.14, claims Ivocerin as a photo initiator have faster, greater polymerization at depth, superior reactivity to curing light having a broad wave length range of 370nm to 460nm compared to camphorquinone).
Bonding agent (OptiBond Solo Plus, Kerr, Orange, CA, USA) was applied on the enamel-etched spots and light cured for 20 seconds using a high-intensity light-emitting diode (LED) curing light (Elipar S10, 3M ESPE, MN, USA).
Aim of current research was to compare the mean shear bond strength (MSB) of adhesive cured at 0mm and 5mm curing light tip distances.
SJ: Users report that UV LED curing light sources produce better cures and better adhesion on a wide range of materials, including recycled materials.
o Curing lights and replacement parts: Kaya Dental features the AB Dental Curing Light, which is small, lightweight, cordless and easytouse.
Plasma Arc curing light (PAC) is designed for the high speed curing of the composite filling materials.
The authors' conclusion was that the dental halogen curing light was "effective in reducing periodontal pathogens in planktonic state" (2) and that this method could be used for the treatment of periodontal disease.
This curing light is as easy to use as a soldering station.