cursitor

cursitor

(ˈkɜːsɪtə)
n
(Law) obsolete (in the Court of Chancery) a clerk or officer
References in classic literature ?
On the eastern borders of Chancery Lane, that is to say, more particularly in Cook's Court, Cursitor Street, Mr.
If he ever steal forth when the dragon is at rest to air himself again in Cook's Court until admonished to return by the crowing of the sanguine cock in the cellar at the little dairy in Cursitor Street, whose ideas of daylight it would be curious to ascertain, since he knows from his personal observation next to nothing about it--if Peffer ever do revisit the pale glimpses of Cook's Court, which no law-stationer in the trade can positively deny, he comes invisibly, and no one is the worse or wiser.
Tulkinghorn goes, as the crow came--not quite so straight, but nearly--to Cook's Court, Cursitor Street.
The view it commands of Cook's Court at one end (not to mention a squint into Cursitor Street) and of Coavinses' the sheriff's officer's backyard at the other she regards as a prospect of unequalled beauty.
Manasseh of Cursitor Street (chief creditors of the Colonel's), complimented his lady upon the brilliant way in which she did business, and declared that there was no professional man who could beat her.
The office entrance will be moved to make better use of ground floor space and make use of the now-pedestrianised Cursitor Street.
He had no articulated economic opinions before he encountered the ideas of Major Douglas at the offices of The New Age in Cursitor Street, London, England.
Peter Russell, of the Custer Association, said the letter was from shoemaker John Cursitor, who was born in Kirkwall in 1819.
(9) The word rogue was first recorded in print in John Awdeley's Fraternity of Vagabonds (1561), and then in Thomas Harman's Caveat for Common Cursitors (1566).
(62) Thomas Harman's Caveat for Common Cursitors, an early classic of the emergent genre of rogue literature, claims to survey at first hand a worthless and predatory "fraternity" organized into criminal specializations (rufflers, priggers, palliards, Abraham men), armed with a horrifying repertoire of stratagems, and protected by an arcane language of its own.
(19) These were A Manifest Detection of Dice-Play (1552), a dialogue like Bullein's; The Fraternity of Vagabonds (1561) by John Awdeley; and A Caveat for Common Cursitors (1566) by Thomas Harman, whose success may have induced Bullein to add the passage at pp.
The sad "Renaissance" of the early modern poor would appear to have directly generated, on a pan-European scale, scores of new fictional texts: Sebastian Brant's Das Narrenshiff (1497), Teseo Pini's Speculum cerretanorum (late fifteenth-century manuscript), the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes (c.1553), Thomas Harman's Caveat For Common Cursitors (1567), Giulio Cesare Croce's L'arte della forfanteria (1617), and many, many more.