curule


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cu·rule

 (kyo͝or′o͞ol′)
adj.
Privileged to sit in a curule chair; of superior rank.

[Latin curūlis, of a curule chair, from currus, chariot, from currere, to run; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]

curule

(ˈkjʊəruːl)
adj
(Historical Terms) (in ancient Rome) of the highest rank, esp one entitled to use a curule chair
[C16: from Latin curūlis of a chariot, from currus chariot, from currere to run]

cu•rule

(ˈkyʊər ul)

adj.
1. privileged to sit in a curule chair.
2. of the highest rank.
[1590–1600; < Latin curūlis, perhaps for *currūlis (if derivative of currus chariot, derivative of currere to run)]
Translations
kuruliszi
References in periodicals archive ?
The design of such Tudor and Stuart thrones--of which the largest group, with no less than five different examples, survives at Knole in Kent--derives from the curule x-framed chairs used by Roman consuls and emperors.
Gneus Flavius, a scribe's son, very humble in origin but otherwise sagacious and eloquent, was made curule aedile.
Godolphin's seven Derby runners were Worldly Manner, who was seventh in 1999, China Visit sixth and Curule seventh in 2000, Express Tour eighth in 2001, Essence of Dubai ninth in 2002, Regal Ransom eighth and Desert Party 14th in 2009.
Flaminius, had filled a curule office, but were not yet in the senate, and they were taken according to the order of their previous appointments.
(27.) See JIMMY CURULE, UNFUNDING TERROR: THE LEGAL RESPONSE TO THE FINANCING OF GLOBAL TERRORISM 176 (2008); HAMM, supra note 26, at 9-17, 196.
curule aediles allowed the victim of nonconforming performance to choose
He showed impressive political insight, great determination and, despite constant opposition, became quaestor in 68 BC, curule aedilis in 65 BC, pontifex maximus (religious leader) in 63 BC, and eventually consul in 59 BC.