cusk


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cusk

 (kŭsk)
n. pl. cusk or cusks
1. A food fish (Brosme brosme) of North Atlantic coastal waters that is related to the cod. Also called torsk, tusk2.
2. See burbot.

[Probably alteration of tusk.]

cusk

(kʌsk)
n, pl cusks or cusk
(Animals) US and Canadian a gadoid food fish, Brosmius brosme, of northern coastal waters, having a single long dorsal fin. Also called torsk
[C17: probably alteration of tusk of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse thorskr codfish]

cusk

(kʌsk)

n., pl. cusks, (esp. collectively) cusk.
an edible North American codlike fish, Brosme brosme.
[1610–20, Amer.; probably variant of tusk kind of fish < Scandinavian; compare Norwegian to(r)sk, c. Old Norse thorskr codfish]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cusk - the lean flesh of a cod-like fish of North Atlantic waterscusk - the lean flesh of a cod-like fish of North Atlantic waters
Brosme brosme, torsk, cusk - large edible marine fish of northern coastal waters; related to cod
saltwater fish - flesh of fish from the sea used as food
2.cusk - large edible marine fish of northern coastal waterscusk - large edible marine fish of northern coastal waters; related to cod
gadoid, gadoid fish - a soft-finned fish of the family Gadidae
cusk - the lean flesh of a cod-like fish of North Atlantic waters
3.cusk - elongate freshwater cod of northern Europe and Asia and North America having barbels around its mouthcusk - elongate freshwater cod of northern Europe and Asia and North America having barbels around its mouth
codfish, cod - major food fish of Arctic and cold-temperate waters
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
2012 impact on the northeast Atlantic cusk West Coast Marshall et al.
Cusk pone en boca de ese viejo amigo de la narradora la que podria ser una de las explicaciones de la estructura de la novela: "Estamos enganchados a la historia del progreso, tanto que se ha apropiado de nuestro mas profundo sentido de la realidad.
Taken individually, these confessionals are singularly entertaining, because Cusk is an unequaled observer of what takes place on the periphery, and she has a keen ear for hearing and recording the ways that people reveal themselves both through what they say and what they do not.
Cusk has an incredible ability to mine universal truths from everyday mundanity, as she circles around self and others through childhood, relationships and motherhood, and fate versus choice.
In A Life's Work: On Becoming a Mother, Rachel Cusk writes that she "arrived at motherhood shocked and unprepared.
For example, cusk eels' call levels reflect their activity cycles--higher at night, lower by day, and seasonal, as the fish migrate away in autumn.
But the difference between cooking cod and dogfish and wolffish and monkfish and pollock and haddock and hake and cusk is not all that different.
In one of her previous memoirs, A Life's Work, Rachel Cusk laid bare the conflicting feelings of new motherhood.
Compare, for instance, the divergent reflections of the Davids Wallace and Cusk upon their shared journey to the Peoria REC (285, 318).
As a final illustration of the equivocal nature of the work involved in 'containing' envious affect by the 'values of feminism', and how complex is the task of discerning its subjectively and objectively ascribed perceptions of inequality, we might turn to a recent depiction of contemporary female envy in a novel by British author Rachel Cusk.
Byatt, Rachel Cusk, Janice Galloway, Caroline Moorehead, Francine Prose, and Eudora Welty; and poetry by Gillian Allnutt, Linda Gregerson, Sadaf Halai, and Selima Mill.
This is particularly evident in the writings of new mothers who document the shock of finding themselves relegated to the margins and feeling they have "returned to some primitive, shameful condition," as Rachel Cusk comments in A Life's Work: On Becoming a Mother.