custumal


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custumal

(ˈkʌstjʊməl)
n, adj
another word for customary2, customary3
[C16: from Medieval Latin custumālis relating to custom]
References in periodicals archive ?
199) at the manor of Alrewas, and explores tensions over heriot (death duty) though a study of a custumal surviving in a manorial survey.
The basis for this assertion is chapter 43 of the Lillois custumal. Chapter 43 states that men will judge men; it is easy to see how Godding arrived at the conclusion that women will not judge men.
Le Livre Roisin, the custumal from Lille, records a dialogue in which a woman was asked, in front of the aldermen, by the person she had chosen to speak for her, to confirm her choice of him;(144) the language of the dialogue and its position in the custumal suggests that the compiler wished it to function as representative of the city's policy in these kinds of matters.
.".(9) The late twelfth-century custumal from Northampton gave this a slightly more developed expression:
Such rules are found both before and after the Black Death, as in the fifteenth-century custumal from Dover:
In the Leges Henrici Primi, we read that if a landowner "in mortal need or in his illness or poverty" is not succoured by his son or relative (in the sense of next of kin) but is aided by another relative or stranger, then he could adopt his helper as his "son".(13) The Tewkesbury custumal (dating from before 1183) held that:
Similar practices are found at Kingsthorpe, Northants, in a custumal of 1484:
The same custom was included in the reissue of the custumal made in 1547, and there is an instance in the court rolls for 1550 of the right of pre-emption being claimed.(20)