swath

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Related to cut a swath: cut a wide swath

swath

 (swŏth, swôth) also swathe (swŏth, swôth, swāth)
n.
1.
a. The width of a scythe stroke or a mowing-machine blade.
b. A path of this width made in mowing.
c. The mown grass or grain lying on such a path.
2. Something likened to a swath, especially a strip, path, or extension: "the motor humming as a girl on skis cut a swath back and forth across the water" (Sarah Dessen).
3. A great stir, impression, or display: "a man who rose from humble beginnings to cut a wide swath in the world" (Garrison Keillor).

[Middle English swathe, from Old English swæth, track.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

swath

(swɔːθ) or

swathe

n, pl swaths (swɔːðz) or swathes
1. (Agriculture) the width of one sweep of a scythe or of the blade of a mowing machine
2. (Agriculture) the strip cut by either of these in one course
3. (Agriculture) the quantity of cut grass, hay, or similar crop left in one course of such mowing
4. a long narrow strip or belt
[Old English swæth; related to Old Norse svath smooth patch]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

swath

(swɒθ, swɔθ)

also swathe



n.
1. the space covered by the stroke of a scythe or the cut of a mowing machine.
2. the piece or strip so cut.
3. a line or ridge of grass, grain, or the like, cut and thrown together by a scythe or mowing machine.
4. a strip, belt, or long and relatively narrow extent of anything.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English swæth, swathu track, trace, c. Old Frisian swethe, Middle High German swade]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.swath - the space created by the swing of a scythe or the cut of a mowing machine
space - an empty area (usually bounded in some way between things); "the architect left space in front of the building"; "they stopped at an open space in the jungle"; "the space between his teeth"
2.swath - a path or strip (as cut by one course of mowing)swath - a path or strip (as cut by one course of mowing)
track, path, course - a line or route along which something travels or moves; "the hurricane demolished houses in its path"; "the track of an animal"; "the course of the river"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

swath

[swɔːθ] N (swaths (pl)) swathe1 [sweɪð] N [of hay] → ringlera f
to cut corn in swathssegar el trigo y dejarlo en ringleras
to cut a swath through sthavanzar por algo a guadañadas
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

swath

nSchwade f; to cut a swath through somethingeine Bahn durch etw schneiden
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Why, he'd a-cut a swath through the free an' easy big business gamblers an' pirates of them days; just as he cut a swath through the hearts of the ladies when he went gallopin' past on that big horse of his, sword clatterin', spurs jinglin', his long hair fiyin', straight as an Indian, clean-built an' graceful as a blue-eyed prince out of a fairy book an' a Mexican caballero all rolled into one; just as he cut a swath through the Johnny Rebs in Civil War days, chargin' with his men all the way through an' back again, an' yellin' like a wild Indian for more.
While it may pale in comparison to recent earthquakes, tsunamis and hurricanes, it cut a swath of death and destruction of unparallel proportions along Long Island and into New England.
To read those reviews--pithy, often one-paragraph notes that collectively cut a swath across the two locales--is to get an impression of early-'60s West Coast gallery culture.