cut glass


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Related to cut glass: glass cutter

cut glass

n.
Glassware shaped or decorated by cutting instruments or abrasive wheels.

cut′-glass′ adj.

cut glass

n
1. (Ceramics)
a. glass, esp bowls, vases, etc, decorated by facet-cutting or grinding
b. (as modifier): a cut-glass vase.
2. (modifier) (of an accent) upper-class; refined

cut′ glass′


n.
glass ornamented or shaped by cutting or grinding with abrasive wheels.
[1835–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cut glass - glass decorated by cutting or grinding facetscut glass - glass decorated by cutting or grinding facets
glassware, glasswork - an article of tableware made of glass
Translations
مَصنُوع من زُجاج مُزيَّن
broušené sklo
krystalglas
metszett üveg
mynstraîur/skorinn kristall
brúsené sklo

cut glass

cut glass

ncristallo

cut

(kat) present participle ˈcutting: past tense past participle cut verb
1. to make an opening in, usually with something with a sharp edge. He cut the paper with a pair of scissors.
2. to separate or divide by cutting. She cut a slice of bread; The child cut out the pictures; She cut up the meat into small pieces.
3. to make by cutting. She cut a hole in the cloth.
4. to shorten by cutting; to trim. to cut hair; I'll cut the grass.
5. to reduce. They cut my wages by ten per cent.
6. to remove. They cut several passages from the film.
7. to wound or hurt by breaking the skin (of). I cut my hand on a piece of glass.
8. to divide (a pack of cards).
9. to stop. When the actress said the wrong words, the director ordered `Cut!'
10. to take a short route or way. He cut through/across the park on his way to the office; A van cut in in front of me on the motorway.
11. to meet and cross (a line or geometrical figure). An axis cuts a circle in two places.
12. to stay away from (a class, lecture etc). He cut school and went to the cinema.
13. (also cut dead) to ignore completely. She cut me dead in the High Street.
noun
1. the result of an act of cutting. a cut on the head; a power-cut (= stoppage of electrical power); a haircut; a cut in prices.
2. the way in which something is tailored, fashioned etc. the cut of the jacket.
3. a piece of meat cut from an animal. a cut of beef.
ˈcutter noun
1. a person or thing that cuts. a wood-cutter; a glass-cutter.
2. a type of small sailing ship.
ˈcutting noun
1. a piece of plant cut off and replanted to form another plant.
2. an article cut out from a newspaper etc. She collects cuttings about the Royal Family.
3. a trench dug through a hillside etc, in which a railway, road etc is built.
adjective
insulting or offending. a cutting remark.
cut glass
glass with ornamental patterns cut on the surface, used for drinking glasses etc.
ˈcut-price
cheaper than normal. cut-price goods; a cut-price store.
ˈcut-throat noun
a murderer.
adjective
fierce; ruthless. cut-throat business competition.
a cut above
(obviously) better than. He's a cut above the average engineer.
cut and dried
fixed and definite. cut-and-dried opinions.
cut back to reduce considerably: The government cut back (on) public spending (noun ˈcutback)
cut both ways
to affect both parts of a question, both people involved, good and bad points etc. That argument cuts both ways!
cut a dash
to have a smart or striking appearance. He cuts a dash in his purple suit.
cut down
1. to cause to fall by cutting. He has cut down the apple tree.
2. to reduce (an amount taken etc). I haven't given up smoking but I'm cutting down.
cut in
to interrupt. She cut in with a remark.
cut it fine
to allow barely enough time, money etc for something that must be done.
cut no ice
to have no effect. This sort of flattery cuts no ice with me.
cut off
1. to interrupt or break a telephone connection. I was cut off in the middle of the telephone call.
2. to separate. They were cut off from the rest of the army.
3. to stop or prevent delivery of. They've cut off our supplies of coal.
cut one's losses
to decide to spend no more money, effort etc on something which is proving unprofitable.
cut one's teeth
to grow one's first teeth. The baby's cutting his first tooth.
cut out
1. to stop working, sometimes because of a safety device. The engines cut out (noun ˈcut-out).
2. to stop. I've cut out smoking.
cut short
1. to make shorter than intended. He cut short his holiday to deal with the crisis.
2. to cause (someone) to stop talking by interrupting them. I tried to apologize but he cut me short.
References in classic literature ?
The cut glass, the silver, the heavy damask which daily appeared upon the table were the envy of many women whose husbands were less generous than Mr.
Ward; lawyer Riverson, the new notable from a dis- tance; next the belle of the village, followed by a troop of lawn-clad and ribbon-decked young heart-breakers; then all the young clerks in town in a body -- for they had stood in the vestibule sucking their cane-heads, a circling wall of oiled and simpering admirers, till the last girl had run their gantlet; and last of all came the Model Boy, Willie Mufferson, taking as heedful care of his mother as if she were cut glass.
way of conciliating piety and worldliness, the nothingness of this life and the desirability of cut glass, the consciousness at once of filthy rags and the best damask, was not a sufficient relief from the weight of her husband's invariable seriousness.
These last were of the finest cut glass, and of a very elegant form--entirely unlike the bottle found in the private repository, which was of the commonest manufacture, and of the shape ordinarily in use among chemists.
exclaimed the major-domo, eyeing the bottle, that was assuming the clear aspect of cut glass with astonishing rapidity; “it don’t matter much, Mistress Remarkable, so long as I keep the keys of the lockers in my pocket.
She saw herself putting the boy to bed by the light of a single candle on the deserted top floor of a "business house," dark under the roof and scintillating exceedingly with lights and cut glass at the level of the street like a fairy palace.
It is uncertain where many of these finely cut glass bowls were made but as many examples have been discovered in Ireland they are generally referred to as Irish bowls from probably the Waterford factory and this style seems to date from about 1770.
We think it is made from oak and the three bottles are cut glass complete with stoppers.
There's not much point me asking you to guess what this beautiful piece of cut glass was used for as I've rather given the game away in the picture: it's a pineapple stand.
Learn to cut glass, replace windshields FREE training
We know, however, that there is a customer out there who wants a more decorative look involving cut glass.
Two silver sugar casters, a set of 10 silver tea and coffee spoons, a silver crochet hook, two silver mustard pots, pairs of modern cuff links, a cut glass bowl, and two cut glass boxes with solid silver lids were also taken from the home.