cut-glass


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cut glass

n.
Glassware shaped or decorated by cutting instruments or abrasive wheels.

cut′-glass′ adj.
Translations

cut-glass

[ˈkʌtˈglɑːs] ADJde vidrio tallado

cut-glass

adj
(lit)aus geschliffenem Glas
accentvornehm
References in classic literature ?
The cut-glass shade is a weak invention of the enemy.
There was a small oak table in the middle of the room; against the wall stood an exquisite chiffonier, on which were resting some cut-glass decanters and goblets.
On the summer afternoon of our tale a small round table, as black as ebony, stood in the centre of the room, sustaining a cut-glass vase of beautiful form and elaborate workmanship.
The lamps were lit, and an open Dutch silver spirit-case stood, with some siphons of soda-water and large cut-glass tumblers, on a little marqueterie table.
Sedley that a muffin and a quantity of orange marmalade spread out in a little cut-glass saucer would be peculiarly agreeable refreshments to Amelia in her most interesting situation.
There were also a few bottles of some white wine, quite possible, which we could drink out of Venetian cut-glass goblets.
But this treating servants as if they were exotic flowers, or china vases, is really ridiculous," said Marie, as she plunged languidly into the depths of a voluminous and pillowy lounge, and drew towards her an elegant cut-glass vinaigrette.
It was a bare, resounding room smelling of stables, with cane forms along the walls, and the walls ornamented at regular intervals with painted lyres and little cut-glass branches for candles, which seemed to be shedding their old-fashioned drops as other branches might shed autumn leaves.
This mark is on the bottom of a cut-glass oval dish.
From the kitchen staff she received a vase and cut-glass posy bowl and, at a special assembly, the pupils presented her with a cut-glass basket.
Jonathan Swift mentions in a letter of 1710 to his friend Stella in Ireland the use of a salad bowl and an advertisement for fine cut-glass salad bowls imported from England appears in Dublin in 1765.
Do only people with cut-glass accents have the right to express opinions?