creeping eruption

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creeping eruption

n.
A human skin disease caused by hookworm or roundworm larvae burrowing and creeping beneath the skin and characterized by eruptions in the form of progressing reddish lines.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cutaneous larva migrans typically present with a skin rash on the feet or thighs of children and young adults who walk around barefoot.
Occasionally, it can give rise to a distinctive form of cutaneous larva migrans, recognized as larva currens.
Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM) is common parasitic infestation in warmer climates among people, who have contact with contaminated soil.
Some hookworms can cause cutaneous larva migrans (CLM) and eosinophilic enteritis [4].
In humans, contact with affected soil can lead to the development of cutaneous larva migrans, although such cases are rarely recorded in Kenya [22].
Cutaneous larva migrans is characterized by a linear, serpiginous rash.
In the patient we describe, transdermal infection causing cutaneous larva migrans was followed by development of eosinophilic enteritis within a 2-week period.
He provided significant inputs for elucidation of carcarial dermatitis, balantidium dysentery, cystic hydatidosis, cow pox, Campylobacter enteritis, Cutaneous larva migrans, soil transmitted zoonotic helminths, pet assisted therapy on human beings, humane control of stray animal population and rabies control besides his pioneering contribution on chemotherapeutic regimen of canine transmissible venereal sarcoma and fundamental characterization of Veterinary public health.
As with roundworms, the migration of hookworm larvae through human tissue can cause a serious inflammatory condition known as cutaneous larva migrans.
The major differential diagnoses of delusional infestation include true ectoparasitic infections and cutaneous larva migrans, which must be ruled out initially by careful recreational, occupational, and travel histories, microscopic and laboratory tests, and drug-induced or neurological disease associated dysesthesias (Table 1).