creeping eruption

(redirected from cutaneous larva migrans)
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creeping eruption

n.
A human skin disease caused by hookworm or roundworm larvae burrowing and creeping beneath the skin and characterized by eruptions in the form of progressing reddish lines.
References in periodicals archive ?
This was the nicest case of cutaneous larva migrans that I've seen in quite some time, although I am fairly sure it has been there for more than a day.
Cutaneous larva migrans is characterized by a linear, serpiginous rash.
In the patient we describe, transdermal infection causing cutaneous larva migrans was followed by development of eosinophilic enteritis within a 2-week period.
The common parasitic skin infections include scabies and lice infestations whereas cutaneous larva migrans and myiasis occur rarely among athletes.
He provided significant inputs for elucidation of carcarial dermatitis, balantidium dysentery, cystic hydatidosis, cow pox, Campylobacter enteritis, Cutaneous larva migrans, soil transmitted zoonotic helminths, pet assisted therapy on human beings, humane control of stray animal population and rabies control besides his pioneering contribution on chemotherapeutic regimen of canine transmissible venereal sarcoma and fundamental characterization of Veterinary public health.
As with roundworms, the migration of hookworm larvae through human tissue can cause a serious inflammatory condition known as cutaneous larva migrans.
She consulted with a local physician, who made a clinical diagnosis of cutaneous larva migrans.
The major differential diagnoses of delusional infestation include true ectoparasitic infections and cutaneous larva migrans, which must be ruled out initially by careful recreational, occupational, and travel histories, microscopic and laboratory tests, and drug-induced or neurological disease associated dysesthesias (Table 1).
Percutaneous larval entry in humans triggers cutaneous larva migrans (CLM), a tortuous trajectory of pruritic erythematous papules, mostly on upper and lower extremities, erratic migration, and a progression of about 2 to 5 cm/day.
Differential diagnosis of EPS includes acne keloidalis nuchae, porokeratosis of Mibelli, actinic granuloma, dermatophyte infections, and cutaneous larva migrans.