cutcherry

cutcherry

(ˈkʌtʃərɪ) or

cutchery

n, pl -cherries or -cheries
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (formerly, in India) government offices and law courts collectively
2. (Law) (formerly, in India) government offices and law courts collectively
[C17: from Hindi Kachachrī]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Rice and lentils have formed the basis of this one-pot dish since at least 250BC, when the Greek general Seleucus noted Indians' love for the combination, and everyone from the fourteenth-century Moroccan explorer Ibn Battuta to the travelling English doctor John Fryer in 1698 seems to have recorded a variation of Cutcherry, Kedgeree or Kisri.
This officer was not to be a distant and awful figure, presiding in his cutcherry [office/court] like a deity in his temple, but a familiar lord, visiting and speaking with them of their quarrels and their crops and looked up to as ma-bap [mother-father] ..." (83)
His Piadah 'askar, or Regular Infantry, was formed into 5 Kachahris (see cutcherry), composed in all of 27 Kushuns.