cyanide


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Related to cyanide: sodium cyanide, cyanide poisoning, potassium cyanide, hydrogen cyanide

cy·a·nide

 (sī′ə-nīd′)
n. also cy·a·nid (-nĭd)
The anionic univalent CN group, or any of various salts or esters of hydrogen cyanide containing a CN group, especially the extremely poisonous compounds potassium cyanide and sodium cyanide.
tr.v. cy·a·nid·ed, cy·a·nid·ing, cy·a·nides
1. To treat (a metal surface) with cyanide to produce a hard surface.
2. To treat (an ore) with cyanide to extract gold or silver.

cyanide

(ˈsaɪəˌnaɪd) or

cyanid

n
1. (Elements & Compounds) any salt of hydrocyanic acid. Cyanides contain the ion CN and are extremely poisonous
2. (Elements & Compounds) another name (not in technical usage) for nitrile
ˌcyaniˈdation n

cy•a•nide

(ˈsaɪ əˌnaɪd, -nɪd)

n., v. -nid•ed, -nid•ing. n.
1. a salt of hydrocyanic acid, as potassium cyanide, KCN.
v.t.
2. to treat with a cyanide, as an ore in order to extract gold.
[1820–30]

cy·a·nide

(sī′ə-nīd′)
Any of a large group of chemical compounds containing the radical CN, especially the very poisonous salts sodium cyanide and potassium cyanide. Cyanides are used to make plastics and to extract and treat metals.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cyanide - any of a class of organic compounds containing the cyano radical -CN
organic compound - any compound of carbon and another element or a radical
acrylonitrile, propenonitrile, vinyl cyanide - a colorless liquid unsaturated nitrile made from propene
2.cyanide - an extremely poisonous salt of hydrocyanic acid
sodium cyanide - a white poisonous salt (NaCN) used in electroplating
potassium cyanide - a poisonous salt (KCN) used in electroplating and in photography
salt - a compound formed by replacing hydrogen in an acid by a metal (or a radical that acts like a metal)
Translations
سيانيد: مِلح الحِمض الأزرَق
kyanid
cyanid
syanidi
cianid
blásÿrusalt
cianidas
cianīds
kyanid

cyanide

[ˈsaɪənaɪd] Ncianuro m
cyanide of potassiumcianuro m potásico

cyanide

[ˈsaɪənaɪd] ncyanure m

cyanide

nZyanid nt, → Blausäuresalz nt; cyanide poisoningBlausäurevergiftung f

cyanide

[ˈsaɪəˌnaɪd] ncianuro

cyanide

(ˈsaiənaid) noun
a deadly type of poison.

cy·a·nide

n. cianuro, compuesto extremadamente venenoso.

cyanide

n cianuro
References in classic literature ?
But I didn't let him get away," he said in triumph when he had dropped the clawing insect into the cyanide bottle where death came painlessly.
Lloyd's discovery of the "death bacillus" of the sea toad, and his experiments on it with potassium cyanide, sent his name and that of his university ringing round the world; nor was Paul a whit behind when he succeeded in producing laboratory colloids exhibiting amoeba-like activities, and when he cast new light upon the processes of fertilization through his startling experiments with simple sodium chlorides and magnesium solutions on low forms of marine life.
It is cyanide of cacodyl, and I have carried that small flask of it about with me for months.
Mr Murtagh, of Alfriston Close, Ingleby Barwick, had been testing cyanide - a task he would carry out every four hours - when he was discovered on a lab floor by colleagues at about 1.
Also cyanide exposure which interferes with iodine metabolism is a possible cause of spinal cord damage [4].
However, the account given in court of how Gu Kailai killed Heywood does not tally with cyanide poisoning, according to Wang, who works for China's top prosecutor's office.
The patient was hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unite with a diagnosis of cyanide posioning.
The police realised it was cyanide - used by Nazi madmen Hitler, Himmler and Goering to commit suicide - and evacuated the building.
Although "cyanidation"--the use of a sodium cyanide compound to separate a precious metal from finely ground rock--has become less common in other forms of mining, it is still the dominant practice in gold mining.
The cause of his death was recorded as cyanide poisoning.
Grandmother Christine, who comes from Hednesford but lives in Huntington, Cannock, is now personally accredited as what is known as a lead cyanide auditor by the International Cyanide Management Institute (ICMI).
Once called Prussic acid, hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was first isolated from the Prussian blue dye in 1783 by the Swedish chemist Carl Wilhelm Scheele.