cyanotype

(redirected from cyanotypes)
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cy·an·o·type

 (sī-ăn′ə-tīp′)
n.

cyanotype

(saɪˈænəˌtaɪp)
n
(Photography) another name for blueprint1

cyanotype

a blueprint.
See also: Photography
References in periodicals archive ?
Botanical book: cyanotypes on photographic paper, 25x20cm Purchased with the support of BankGiro lottery, the W.
This exhibition explores a host of tonal ranges emulating the sepias, cyanotypes, uranotypes of years past, in addition to the more traditional black and white.
50 Vintage Saturdays at The Shipping Forecast The Shipping Forecast, 15 Slater Street, 01517096901, - Sat 07 May Family art club Walker Art Gallery, William Brown Street, 0151 478 4199, - Sat 07 May Graffiti Art class Zap Graffiti Arts, 9 Oldham Place, 01515382176, - Sat 07 May Introduction to Cyanotypes The Bluecoat, School Lane, 0151 702 5324, - Sat 07 May, PS130.
The exposed lines, which in places are shadowed pale blue due to the projected movement of the hand, are nonetheless fascinating and delicate--a bit like Anna Atkins' watery sea algae cyanotypes of 1843 (figure 6).
Drawn from his own personal collection of photogravures, collotypes, cyanotypes, engravings, stereoviews, cartes de visites, and more, he offers us an intimate mirror of a ghostly Jamaica in silver gelatin and albumen print, in an age before the tropical colors of turquoise blue sea and deep greenery tinged our collective imaginary of the Caribbean.
The exhibition creates a clever affinity between these and the "Photogenic Paintings," 1974-77, large cyanotypes of undulating fiberglass mesh Kasten made in the sunlit courtyard of the Los Angeles studio she shared with her then husband, photographer Leland Rice.
Chapters cover chemical safety, materials and techniques, digital negaitves, fugitive (non-fixed and semi-fixed) printing, cyanotypes, salt and albumen prints, Van Dyke brown/kallitype/argyrotypes, platinum and palladium prints, wet plate collodion, liquid emulsion, gum printing, transfers and other ideas, and printing on ceramics.
Means for crafting modern-day renditions of anthotypes, cyanotypes, tintypes, and daguerreotypes are discussed, as well as ways to blend these historical techniques with modern images to recreate the appearance of times past.
Presenting images selected from the museum's permanent collection by curator of photographs, Russell Lord, the exhibition included a range of processes, from daguerreotypes to cyanotypes, to photogravures, to gelatin silver, dye-transfer, and inkjet prints.
To create these pictures, he re-photographed the x-rays on a light box, scanning and extensively manipulating the resulting images, bringing forth colors that reference cyanotypes, albumen prints, and other 19th-century photographic processes.
In the exhibit there were examples of early nature prints such as those of Christiano Ludwig and Johann Knipnof from the mid-18th century, along with 19th-century work such as that of Anna Atkins, who specialized in cyanotypes of seaweeds.
These beautifully evocative images are called cyanotypes (figure 3).