cybernetics

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cy·ber·net·ics

 (sī′bər-nĕt′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The theoretical study of communication and control processes in biological, mechanical, and electronic systems, especially the comparison of these processes in biological and artificial systems.

[From Greek kubernētēs, governor, from kubernān, to govern.]

cy′ber·net′ic adj.
cy′ber·net′i·cal·ly adv.
cy′ber·net′i·cist, cy′ber·ne·ti′cian (-nĭ-tĭsh′ən) n.

cybernetics

(ˌsaɪbəˈnɛtɪks)
n
(General Engineering) (functioning as singular) the branch of science concerned with control systems in electronic and mechanical devices and the extent to which useful comparisons can be made between man-made and biological systems. See also feedback1
[C20: from Greek kubernētēs steersman, from kubernan to steer, control]
ˌcyberˈnetic, ˌcyberˈnetical adj
ˌcyberˈnetically adv
ˌcyberˈneticist, cybernetician n

cy•ber•net•ics

(ˌsaɪ bərˈnɛt ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the comparative study of organic control and communication systems, as the brain and its neurons, and mechanical or electronic systems analogous to them, as robots or computers.
[1948; < Greek kybernḗt(ēs) helmsman, steersman (kybernē-, variant s. of kybernân to steer + -tēs agent suffix) + -ics]
cy`ber•net′ic, cy`ber•net′i•cal, adj.
cy`ber•net′i•cal•ly, adv.
cy`ber•net′i•cist, cy`ber•ne•ti′cian (-nɪˈtɪʃ ən) n.

cy·ber·net·ics

(sī′bər-nĕt′ĭks)
The study of communication and control processes in biological, mechanical, and electronic systems. Research in cybernetics often involves the comparison of these processes in biological and artificial systems.

cybernetics

the comparative study of complex electronic devices and the nervous system in an attempt to understand better the nature of the human brain. — cyberneticist, n.cybernetic, adj.
See also: Automation
the comparative study of complex electronic devices and the nervous system in an attempt to understand better the nature of the human brain. — cyberneticist, n.cybernetic, adj.
See also: Brain
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cybernetics - (biology) the field of science concerned with processes of communication and control (especially the comparison of these processes in biological and artificial systems)
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
informatics, information processing, information science, IP - the sciences concerned with gathering, manipulating, storing, retrieving, and classifying recorded information
Translations
kybernetika
kibernetika

cybernetics

[ˌsaɪbəˈnetɪks] NSINGcibernética f

cybernetics

[ˌsaɪbərˈnɛtɪks] ncybernétique f

cybernetics

[ˌsaɪbəˈnɛtɪks] nsgcibernetica

cy·ber·net·ics

n. cibernética, estudio del uso de medios electrónicos y mecanismos de comunicación aplicados a sistemas biológicos tales como los sistemas nervioso y cerebral.
References in periodicals archive ?
29) Liapunov's choice of the epithet reflected the nature of the bonds connecting the two men--as cyberneticians and warriors.
In artificial intelligence, it was cyberneticians such as Wiener who got the philosophy right, even as the symbolists appeared to be making far more concrete progress at the time.
Pickering (2006) explained how cyberneticians designed technologies as ontology engines to both demonstrate their philosophy and spread it through society.
Quite aside from references to 'feedback' in The Electronic Revolution, and to the problem of steering in his essay on 'The Limits of Control', references to post-hypnotic suggestion, psychotropic drugs, brain surgery, amongst other things, whilst not cybernetic per se resonate powerfully with the psychiatric interests of cyberneticians.
It is in this sense endogenous, intrinsic or, as the cyberneticians say, a 'self-regulating' or 'self-organising' system.
McEwan, who seems to have studied at least briefly with Gordon Pask and Stafford Beer, and who draws upon their British tradition of 'management' cybernetics--focused on organisational dynamics and social interaction, rather than, say, artificial neurons or anti-aircraft guns--to articulate a case for anarchy based in the scientific concept of self-organisation, or as he states himself, 'to suggest that some of the concepts used by cyberneticians studying evolving self-organizing systems may be relevant to anarchist theory, and that some of the conclusions drawn from this study tend to favour libertarian models of social organization' (McEwan 1963: 270).
Do the cyberneticians and their ilk really imagine that people can be talked into 'free experimentation' within bounds laid down by authoritarian decree?
As the cyberneticians themselves would tell us, no self-correcting, self-sustaining system is completely "closed.
Poe's text is essential for psychoanalysis, Lacan declared, but he also noted the fact that cyberneticians make something of it too.