cyberpunk


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cy·ber·punk

 (sī′bər-pŭnk′)
n.
Fast-paced science fiction involving futuristic computer-based societies.

cy′ber·punk′ adj.

cyberpunk

(ˈsaɪbəˌpʌŋk)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Movements) a genre of science fiction that features rebellious computer hackers and is set in a dystopian society integrated by computer networks
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a writer of cyberpunk

cy•ber•punk

(ˈsaɪ bərˌpʌŋk)
n.
1. science fiction featuring extensive human interaction with supercomputers and a punk ambiance.
2. Slang. a computer hacker.
[1980–85; cyber- + punk2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cyberpunk - a programmer who breaks into computer systems in order to steal or change or destroy information as a form of cyber-terrorism
act of terrorism, terrorism, terrorist act - the calculated use of violence (or the threat of violence) against civilians in order to attain goals that are political or religious or ideological in nature; this is done through intimidation or coercion or instilling fear
coder, computer programmer, programmer, software engineer - a person who designs and writes and tests computer programs
terrorist - a radical who employs terror as a political weapon; usually organizes with other terrorists in small cells; often uses religion as a cover for terrorist activities
2.cyberpunk - a writer of science fiction set in a lawless subculture of an oppressive society dominated by computer technology
author, writer - writes (books or stories or articles or the like) professionally (for pay)
3.cyberpunk - a genre of fast-paced science fiction involving oppressive futuristic computerized societies
science fiction - literary fantasy involving the imagined impact of science on society
Translations

cyberpunk

[ˈsaɪbəpʌŋk] N (Literat) → ciberpunk m

cyberpunk

[ˈsaɪbərpʌŋk] ncyberpunk m
References in periodicals archive ?
Alem da presenca do cyborg na ficcao cyberpunk, tambem ha as Inteligencias Artificiais.
The ass-kicking techno-babes of cyberpunk him and hction should be read as examples of the (post)feminist subject.
Ever since its emergence in the early 1980s, cyberpunk science fiction has been associated with, and approached through, the hard-boiled detective novels of Raymond Chandler.
WHAT IS CYBERPUNK? `The term cyberpunk was coined by Gardner Dozois, editor of Asimov's Science Fiction magazine, to describe a movement in science fiction (in the '80s) which emphasized the interplay between artificial intelligence and humans.
David Porush also draws on cyberpunk fiction, in an essay that explores the relevance of mystical traditions and discourses of transcendence to the concept of cyberspace as it is popularly represented.
In his review of definitions of science fiction, John Walchak (1993) concludes that "science fiction is the literary [or textual] investigation of the relationship between humanity and technology, and (thus) of the myriad kinds of change produced by science and technology." If the investigation of our relationship to science and technology is the definitive feature of science fiction, then the exploration of human couplings with a particular type of technology constitutes a broad categorization of cyberpunk fiction.
(I think this cleavage between dystopic, cyberpunk sci-fi and lighter stuff like Star Wars and the Star Trek movies is a pretty obvious one.
You might not be a cyberpunk or cybernaut, but the day will soon arrive when you'll have to venture into the labyrinths of cyberspace.
Being a New Age novel, the plot line and character development are a thinly veiled rendering of the author's own metaphysical and philosophical ponderings on humanity and the universe--musings which are even less profound than the average cyberpunk sci-fi thriller.
cyberpunk A science-fiction subgenre comprising works characterized by countercultural antiheroes trapped in a dehumanized, high-tech future.
Schuyler and Swanson devote one chapter to cyberpunk fiction and provide a reasonably useful annotated bibliography of books, periodicals, and films.
In the case of the computer virus reality, the art is "cyberpunk," a strangely compelling genre of science fiction that has gained a cult following among hackers operating on both sides of the law.