cyberterrorism


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cyberterrorism

(ˈsaɪbəˌtɛrərɪzəm)
n
1. (Law) the illegal use of computers and the internet to achieve some goal
2. (Computer Science) the illegal use of computers and the internet to achieve some goal
ˈcyberˌterrorist n
Translations

cyberterrorism

[ˈsaɪbəˌterərɪsm] Nciberterrorismo m
References in periodicals archive ?
(292.) Simon Bronitt and Miriam Gani, 'Shifting Boundaries of Cybercrime: from Computer Hacking to Cyberterrorism' (2003) 27 Criminal Law Journal 303, 316.
Earlier this month, Anonymous was labeled a cyberterrorism group by the Arizona Department of Public Safety after members of the group repeatedly attacked Arizona police union websites to protest the state's tough immigration laws.
Bulgariaas State Agency for National Security (DANS) has decided to increase the number of computer experts in order to improve the efforts for combating cyberterrorism.
Included in the predictions is an analysis of future blended threats, terrorism, and data loss over the dynamic Web that demonstrate the potential for targeted 2011 cyberterrorism attacks.
In the last few months, we have been hearing more and more about cyberterrorism and the growing number of attacks on our nation's information technology infrastructure.
Cyberterrorism has become one of the most significant threats to the national and international security of the modern state, and cyberattacks are occurring with increased frequency.
He avoids highly technical explanation as he provides descriptions of various kinds of attacks, threats, and fraudulent activities related to personal and organizational digital resources, such as cyberterrorism, hijacking, phishing, spamming, viruses, and identity theft, and ways to combat them.
"Even if you are right about the fact of being attacked, initial diagnoses are often wrong," Professor Peter Sommer, an expert on cyberterrorism at the London School of Economics, said.
"[The] author raises the stakes to catastrophic levels, penetrating the shady world of cyberterrorism to reveal a chilling yet entirely plausible scenario of technology gone awry.
The triple threat of cybercrime, cyberterrorism, and asymmetric information warfare is here to stay.
The other slender volumes take similar approaches, as in Policing the Internet, with articles debating, among other subjects, whether the government should regulate the Internet, whether cyberterrorism is a serious threat, and whether social-networking sites contribute to crime.
Cyberterrorism has become a buzzword of sorts because the severity--and existence--of the threat is debated.