cyclamate


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cy·cla·mate

 (sī′klə-māt′, sĭk′lə-)
n.
A salt of cyclamic acid formerly used as an artificial sweetener, especially:
a. Sodium cyclamate.
b. Calcium cyclamate.

cyclamate

(ˈsaɪkləˌmeɪt; ˈsɪkləˌmeɪt)
n
(Biochemistry) a salt or ester of cyclamic acid. Certain of the salts have a very sweet taste and were formerly used as food additives and sugar substitutes
[C20: cycl(ohexyl-sulph)amate]

cy•cla•mate

(ˈsaɪ kləˌmeɪt, ˈsɪk lə-)

n.
any of several compounds formerly used as a noncaloric sweetener in foods and beverages: banned as a carcinogen.
[1950–55; cycl(ohexylsulf)am(ic acid) + -ate2]
Translations

cyclamate

[ˈsɪkləmeɪt] Nciclamato m

cy·cla·mate

n. ciclamato, agente artificial dulcificante.

cyclamate

n ciclamato
References in periodicals archive ?
Results corresponding to nuclear diameters of the proximal convoluted tubules in the kidneys for the control group and that treated with sodium cyclamate are presented in Table III.
REIS (2007) studied the elaboration of strawberry light yogurts with different sweeteners, such as sucralose, aspartame, aspartame and acesulfame-k mixture, cyclamate and saccharin mixture, cyclamate, and saccharin and stevia mixture, using the internal preference mapping methodology.
In 1969, FDA removed cyclamate salts from its GRAS list as a result of safety questions, and President Nixon directed FDA to reexamine the safety of the GRAS substances.
Zambiazi Chim and Bruscatto [16] evaluated 4 strawberry jam formulations (F1 conventional jam and F2, F3, and F4 "light" jellies) with different concentrations of sweeteners (saccharin, cyclamate, and cyclamate: saccharin) over a period of time (0, 60 and 120 days) and found that the conventional jam and "light" had average total sugar values of 62.21% and 44.7% during storage.
Sodium Cyclamate, coded as E952 and commonly known as artificial sweetener, was banned by the FDA because of it cancer-causing actions.
The sweeteners used in liquid preparations ready to drink comprise aspartame, sodium cyclamate, acesulfame potassium and sodium saccharin, with the exception of juices ready for consumption of Ambev, which have no sweeteners in their chemical composition, according to the site of presentation of the products.
[2] whilst looking for a natural sweetener to replace saccharin and cyclamate. Kurihara and Beidler [3] first reported in Science that the active ingredient could be a special glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 44 kDa, and Brouwer et al.
The most worldwide consumed sweeteners are aspartame (ASP), sucralose (SUC), acesulfame (ACS), saccharin (SAC), cyclamate (CYC), neotame (NEO), alitame (ALI), and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC) [3].
The placebo was made of caramel, gardenia yellow pigment, sunset yellow, permicol egg yellow, cocoa brown, citric acid, sodium cyclamate, dextrin, and broadleaf holly leaf [20].
The main artificial sweeteners are; Aspartame, Acesulfame K, Saccharin, Sucralose, and Cyclamate (72).
Safety concerns arose over its sweetener saccharin, and cyclamate was removed from the market.
In each no added sugars formulations was used specific type of sweeteners: aspartame (F2); sodium saccharine and sodium cyclamate (F3); potassium acesulfame and sucralose (F4).