cyclopaedia


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cy·clo·pe·di·a

also cy·clo·pae·di·a  (sī′klə-pē′dē-ə)
n.
An encyclopedia.

[Short for encyclopedia.]

cy′clo·pe′dic (-dĭk) adj.
cy′clo·pe′dist (-dĭst) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cyclopedia, cyclopaedia

encyclopedia. — cyclopedist, cyclopaedist, n. — cyclopedic, cyclopaedic, adj.
See also: Books
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cyclopaedia - a reference work (often in several volumes) containing articles on various topics (often arranged in alphabetical order) dealing with the entire range of human knowledge or with some particular specialtycyclopaedia - a reference work (often in several volumes) containing articles on various topics (often arranged in alphabetical order) dealing with the entire range of human knowledge or with some particular specialty
book of facts, reference book, reference work, reference - a book to which you can refer for authoritative facts; "he contributed articles to the basic reference work on that topic"
book of knowledge - an elementary encyclopedia dealing with general knowledge
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

cyclopaedia

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
'Clarel, a Poem and Pilgrimage in the Holy Land' (1876), is a long mystical poem requiring, as some one has said, a dictionary, a cyclopaedia, and a copy of the Bible for its elucidation.
unless, indeed, he took down a dusty row of volumes with gray-paper backs and dingy labels--the volumes of an old Cyclopaedia which he had never disturbed.
The former was a sort of cyclopaedia to him, which he supposed to contain an abstract of human knowledge, as indeed it does to a considerable extent.
(10.) See John Joseph Lalor, Cyclopaedia of Political Science, Political Economy, and of the Political History of the United States by the best American and European Authors, edited by John J.
Chambers's Cyclopaedia of English Literature, a History, Critical and Biographical, of British and American Authors, with Specimens of Their Writings.
Duyckinck, Cyclopaedia of American Literature (New York: Scribner, 1855); and Samuel L.
E sugeria, assim como o editor de Cyclopaedia, que o vocabulo "e utilizado entre nos [...] para a mudanca produzida pela admissao do rei Guilherme e a rainha Maria" (JOHNSON 1755).
Unlike the imaginatively-restrained Murray, the writer elaborates on the significant religious ideas surrounding the rose of Jericho: ".the people of the East have attached the fable that the plant first blossomed at the moment when our Saviour was born" (The Penny Cyclopaedia 105).
Countless eighteenth-century publications glorified the "art of fortification." Far from the first popular publication to gloss military terminology with the aid of a labeled diagram, the Cyclopaedia was merely the least specialized source for such content.
A Certain Chinese Cyclopaedia...." is inspired by a fantastical encyclopedia from a short story by Jorge Luis Borges.
The first quotation comes from Chambers' Cyclopaedia as found at the ARTFL server at the University of Chicago--http://artflsrv01.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin /philologic/getobject.pl?c.0:2364.

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