cynghanedd


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cynghanedd

(kʌŋˈhanɛð)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a complex system of rhyme and alliteration used in Welsh verse
[from Welsh]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Ymysg y danteithion llengar ar Mwy o'r Babell Len bydd "Trydar Mewn Trawiadau", sgwrs rhwng Llion Jones ac Angharad Price yn trafod her y bardd Llion Jones am grynhoi ei hynt a'i helynt ar Twitter mewn cynghanedd yn unig.
Ymysg y danteithion llengar ar Mwy o'r Babell Len bydd 'Trydar Mewn Trawiadau', sgwrs rhwng Llion Jones ac Angharad Price yn trafod her y bardd Llion Jones am grynhoi ei hynt a'i helynt ar Twitter mewn cynghanedd yn unig.
As a teenager she honed her skills by taking lessons in cynghanedd -- the challenging form of strict metre poetry with internal rhymes.
5-8) Writing three years later to Bridges, to whom the sonnet evidently gave much trouble, Hopkins blames its opacities on a fascination with cynghanedd, the "consonant chiming" characteristic of Welsh poetry.
German, French, and Italian poetry seem relatively simple compared to the structure of a Welsh cynghanedd verse.
The Master of the Ceremony was Mererid Hopwood; the person who introduced Gwynfor to the Welsh "cynghanedd".
like hill/hail/hung, which suggests the Welsh practice called cynghanedd
I find that most can only tolerate a small dose of cynghanedd (strict-metre verse) and tend to ring off.
that compels"); the Siamese twins of polysyllabic abstracts ("absence" and "presence") turn the monosyllabic word "hope" into a negligible lightweight, even as the conspiracy of agreed sounds between "absence," "presence" and "address" not only surround "hope" but also drown out the sonically isolated word "reply." In his early years as a poet, Thomas had after all been fascinated by the challenge to reproduce the intricate alliterative and assonantal patterns of Welsh-language cynghanedd poetry in English, and his experiments had helped sharpen his sensitivity to "morphemes and phonemes" (Davies, Gororau'r 163 ff.).
Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-89), now recognized as a major Victorian poet, was an Oxford undergraduate (1863-67), Jesuit (1868-89), priest (1877-89), and (from 1875) poetic innovator in form (the sonnet), sound (e.g., Welsh cynghanedd), and rhythm (his famous "sprung rhythm").
No extract, however, could do justice to the sustained din of pun, allusion, neologism, alliteration, cynghanedd, apostrophe, parenthesis, rhetorical question, French, Latin, 'anent', 'perchance', 'would fain', 'for the nonce,' - here is style and no mistake.
But Graves was probably aware of this similarity; his father was a keen pan-Celticist, and at an early age Graves had learnt the cynghanedd verse-scheme of Welsh bards, which depends on the use of the same sequence of consonants in successive lines, but with different vowels.(19) There is no direct correlation between the actions of Messalina and those of Mussolini, but Graves may have enjoyed casting the portentous dictator in the role of Claudius' lascivious and intriguing wife.