cyprid


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cyprid

(ˈsaɪprɪd)
n
(Animals) another name for cypris
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, we propose that blue sharks scavenge for food on the basis of finding the cyprid larval stage and juvenile cosmopolitan duck barnacle (Lepas anatifera) associated with the prey item 'unidentified cephalopods.' The present study contributes new information on the diet of blue sharks.
"Most biofouling researchers assume that cyprid larval adhesive plaques are primarily composed of proteins and peptides, but we discovered that lipids are also present, which means that the composition of the permanent adhesive is far more complicated that previously realized."
The screening of sponge extracts for antifouling activity using a bioassay with laboratory-reared cyprid larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite.
Influence of substratum heterogeneity and settled barnacle density on the settlement of cyprid larvae.
cyprid swimming, we found that their thoracopods contained setae permanently cross-linked by fused setules.
In order to determine and evaluate spat collection from the wild, giant barnacle spat collectors were installed in the month of October 2009, initially using existing competent larvae (cyprid) in each site.
Microorganisms such as bacteria, diatoms, algae, marine fungus, protozoan, cyprid and/or rotifer generally incorporate into the fouling biofilm within 24 hrs, though microorganisms (e.g., barnacles, tunicates, mollusks, bryozoans) may adhere to the surface days or weeks later.
All barnacles have free-swimming larvae, and settlement is accomplished by the highly specialized cyprid larval stage (Walker et al., 1987; Glenner, 1999; Hoeg et al., 2004).
amphitrite and, using sugar-blocking experiments, demonstrated that lentil lectin (LCA) treatment of SIPC hindered cyprid settlement (Matsumura et al.
This study used morphometric analyses to compare the structure of the third antennular segment, also called the attachment organ, in cyprid larvae from cirripede species representing a diverse set of taxonomic groups.
The objectives of this study were (1) to determine if daily cohorts of nonfeeding cyprid larvae of the barnacle Semibalanus balanoides differ in physiological quality, by measuring the total organic content of newly attached cyprids, and (2) to determine if juvenile growth capacity (measured under controlled laboratory conditions) varies among cohorts attaching throughout a recruitment season.
They have been well documented in marine mussels, sea cucumbers, sandcastle worms, and caddisfly larvae (Stewart et al., 2004; Flammang et al., 2009; Stewart and Wang, 2010; Wang and Stewart, 2012) and were recently identified in the permanent adhesive of barnacle cyprid larvae (Gohad et al., 2014).