cytopathology

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cytopathology

(ˌsaɪtəʊpəˈθɒlədʒɪ)
n
a branch of pathology that examines individual cells in order to diagnose disease

cytopathology

Medicine. the branch of pathology that studies the effects of disease on the cellular level. — cytopathologist, n.cytopathologic, cytopathological, adj.
See also: Disease and Illness
Translations
citopatologija
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References in periodicals archive ?
4-HNE is believed to be predominantly responsible from the cytopathologic effects seen during oxidative stress.
Hemangiopericytoma and SFT form a histologic spectrum of fibroblastic-type mesenchymal neoplasms with overlapping clinical, imaging, and cytopathologic features.
EORTC criteria for proven lower respiratory tract invasive mold infection Analysis/specimen Microscopic analysis Histopathologic, cytopathologic, or direct microscopic examination of a specimen obtained from a normally sterile site Culture: sterile material Recovery of a mold by culture of a specimen obtained by a sterile procedure from a normally sterile and clinically or radiologically abnormal site consistent with an infectious disease process (excluding bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) Culture: blood Blood culture that yields a mold TABLE 2.
Deep fibromatosis (desmoid tumor): cytopathologic characteristics, clinicoradiologic features, and immunohistochemical findings on fine-needle aspiration.
Fine-needle aspiration cytology for breast lesions and cytopathologic correlations.
The varied cytopathologic findings may be related to the proliferation and transformation of basal cells of the mucosal epithelium toward ameloblastic carcinoma and variable squamous differentiation [35].
Raboud et al., "Evaluation of HIV and highly active antiretroviral therapy on the natural history of human papillomavirus infection and cervical cytopathologic findings in HIV-positive and high-risk HIV-negative women," The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol.
Medical records, US images and radiological reports, and cytopathologic reports of these patients were reviewed, retrospectively.
These more aggressive forms of leiomyosarcoma were also strongly associated with a trend towards decreased survival; however, in comparison to those that had no change in cytopathologic features, the difference did not reach statistical significance.
The cytopathology data showed that specimens were collected from 100% of the participating women and that the specimens made available for cytopathologic examination were adequate for examination by the pathologist for classification.