czar


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Related to czar: Russian Revolution

czar

 (zär, tsär)
n.
1. also tsar or tzar (zär, tsär) A male monarch or emperor, especially one of the emperors who ruled Russia until the revolution of 1917.
2. A person having great power or authority: an energy czar.

[Russian tsar', from Old Russian tsĭsarĭ, emperor, king, from Old Church Slavonic tsěsarĭ, from Gothic kaisar, from Greek, from Latin Caesar, emperor; see caesar.]

czar′dom n.
Usage Note: The word czar, a borrowing from Russian originally referring to the emperor of Russia, is a cousin of the German word Kaiser; both words descend from the name of the Roman emperor Julius Caesar. The spelling tsar is preferred in most Slavic scholarship, as it follows the standard conventions of Russian transliteration. The spelling czar is the more common form in American English, and is the only one employed in the extended sense "someone in authority," as in energy czar.

czar

(zɑː)
n
(Historical Terms) a variant spelling (esp US) of tsar
ˈczardom n

czar

or tsar

(zɑr, tsɑr)

n.
1. an emperor or king.
2. (often cap.) the former emperor of Russia.
3. an autocratic ruler or leader.
4. any person exercising great authority or power: a czar of industry.
[1545–55; < Russian tsar', Old Russian tsĭsarĭ emperor, king (akin to Old Church Slavonic tsěsarĭ) < Gothic kaisar emperor (< Greek or Latin); Greek kaîsar < Latin Caesar Caesar]
czar′dom, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.czar - a male monarch or emperor (especially of Russia prior to 1917)czar - a male monarch or emperor (especially of Russia prior to 1917)
Russia - a former empire in eastern Europe and northern Asia created in the 14th century with Moscow as the capital; powerful in the 17th and 18th centuries under Peter the Great and Catherine the Great when Saint Petersburg was the capital; overthrown by revolution in 1917
crowned head, monarch, sovereign - a nation's ruler or head of state usually by hereditary right
2.czar - a person having great power
autocrat, despot, tyrant - a cruel and oppressive dictator
Translations
car
car
tsaar
tsaari
car
cár
tsar, keisari
cars
cár
car
tsar

czar

[zɑːʳ] Nzar m

czar

[ˈzɑːr] ntsar m

czar

nZar m

czar

[zɑːʳ] nzar m inv

tsar,

czar,

tzar

(zaː) noun
(the status of) any of the former emperors of Russia. He was crowned tsar; Tsar Nicholas.
References in classic literature ?
All the Powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Czar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.
It was in this park that that fellow with an unpronounceable name made the attempt upon the Russian Czar's life last spring with a pistol.
Yet Dives himself, he too lives like a Czar in an ice palace made of frozen sighs, and being a president of a temperance society, he only drinks the tepid tears of orphans.
What was Poland to the Czar? What Greece to the Turk?
"An aristocrat need not be ashamed of the trade," observed Laurence; "for the Czar Peter the Great once served an apprenticeship to it."
Dirkovitch was a Russian - a Russian of the Russians - who appeared to get his bread by serving the Czar as an officer in a Cossack regiment, and corresponding for a Russian newspaper with a name that was never twice alike.
The other half of the second page is made up of two paragraphs under the head of "Miscellaneous News." One of these paragraphs tells about a quarrel between the Czar of Russia and his eldest son, twenty-one and a half lines; and the other tells about the atrocious destruction of a peasant child by its parents, forty lines, or one-fifth of the total of the reading-matter contained in the paper.
Two persons whose desires are moderate may live well enough in Brussels on an income which would scarcely afford a respectable maintenance for one in London: and that, not because the necessaries of life are so much dearer in the latter capital, or taxes so much higher than in the former, but because the English surpass in folly all the nations on God's earth, and are more abject slaves to custom, to opinion, to the desire to keep up a certain appearance, than the Italians are to priestcraft, the French to vain-glory, the Russians to their Czar, or the Germans to black beer.
Of late he has accomplished it by trumped-up evidence convicting his victims of treason against the czar, and the Russian police, who are always only too ready to fasten guilt of this nature upon any and all, have accepted his version and exonerated him."
Every man is the lord of a realm beside which the earthly empire of the Czar is but a petty state, a hummock left by the ice.
They knew that their colonel's hand had closed, and that he who broke that iron discipline would not go to the front: nothing in the world will persuade one of our soldiers, when he is ordered to the north on the smallest of affairs, that he is not immediately going gloriously to slay Cossacks and cook his kettles in the palace of the Czar. A few of the younger men mourned for Mulcahy's beer, because the campaign was to be conducted on strict temperance principles, but as Dan and Horse Egan said sternly, "We've got the beer-man with us.
He will have to explain offeecially how the deuce-an'-all he is writing love-letters to the Czar. And they are very clever maps ...