dactylology


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dac·ty·lol·o·gy

 (dăk′tə-lŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The use of the fingers and hands to communicate and convey ideas, as in the manual alphabet used by hearing-impaired and speech-impaired people.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dactylology

(ˌdæktɪˈlɒlədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
(Communications & Information) the method of using manual sign language, as in communicating with deaf people
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dac•ty•lol•o•gy

(ˌdæk təˈlɒl ə dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
[1650–60]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

dactylology

the science of communicating by sign language using the hands and fingers.
See also: Fingers and Toes
the science of manual sign language, as for use in communicating with the deaf. — dactylotogist, n.dactylologic, dactylological, adj.
See also: Gesture
the technique of communicating through signs made with the fingers, as in the manual alphabet for the deaf.
See also: Deafness
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

dactylology

The practice of using manual sign language, as in communicating with people with hearing impairment.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
Translations
dactilologia

dac·ty·lol·o·gy

n. dactilología, lenguaje mímico o por señas.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
It details the language plan created by NAD leaders to preserve the original form of signing that reflected the sign language of the founders; the biographies of each sign master and their contributions to the films; the lexicon and morphology of early ASL; the history of dactylology and its role and influence in the morphological system and the loan-sign and name-sign systems; and the historical context for the grammar of early ASL.
As he speaks, his bound hands wave in some inborn dactylology. He pauses for breath and puts his hands on his head.
The following strategies for improving their phonological components are emphasized: dactylology, lip reading, cochlear implants, cued-speech, sign language and kinesthetic stimulation.