daguerreotype

(redirected from daguerreotypist)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
click for a larger image
daguerreotype

da·guerre·o·type

 (də-gâr′ə-tīp′)
n.
1. An early photographic process with the image made on a light-sensitive silver-coated metallic plate.
2. A photograph made by this process.
tr.v. da·guerre·o·typed, da·guerre·o·typ·ing, da·guerre·o·types
To make a daguerreotype of.

[French, after Louis Jacques Mandé Daguerre.]

da·guerre′o·typ′er n.
da·guerre′o·typ′y n.

daguerreotype

(dəˈɡɛrəʊˌtaɪp)
n
1. (Photography) one of the earliest photographic processes, in which the image was produced on iodine-sensitized silver and developed in mercury vapour
2. (Photography) a photograph formed by this process
daˈguerreoˌtyper, daˈguerreoˌtypist n
daˈguerreoˌtypy n

da•guerre•o•type

(dəˈgɛər əˌtaɪp, -i əˌtaɪp)

n., v. -typed, -typ•ing. n.
1. an obsolete photographic process, invented in 1839, in which a picture made on a silver surface sensitized with iodine is developed by exposure to mercury vapor.
2. a picture made by this process.
v.t.
3. to photograph by this process.
[< French (1839), after Latin. J. M. Daguerre; see -o-, -type]
da•guerre′o•typ`er, da•guerre′o•typ`ist, n.
da•guerre`o•typ′ic (-ˈtɪp ɪk) adj.
da•guerre′o•typ′y, n.

daguerreotype

an obsolete form of photography in which images were produced on chemically treated plates of metal or glass. — daguerreotypic, daguerreotypical, adj.daguerreotypist, n.
See also: Photography

daguerreotype

An early type of photographic process using a light-sensitive silver-coated metallic plate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.daguerreotype - a photograph made by an early photographic processdaguerreotype - a photograph made by an early photographic process; the image was produced on a silver plate sensitized to iodine and developed in mercury vapor
photo, photograph, pic, exposure, picture - a representation of a person or scene in the form of a print or transparent slide; recorded by a camera on light-sensitive material
Translations
Daguerreotypie

daguerreotype

nDaguerreotypie f
vtnach dem Daguerreotypieverfahren fotografieren

daguerreotype

[dəˈgɛrəʊˌtaɪp] ndagherrotipo
References in classic literature ?
So, my dear Miss Pyncheon," said the daguerreotypist, --for it was that sole other occupant of the seven-gabled mansion,-- "I am glad to see that you have not shrunk from your good purpose.
A play with music," taking place in 1848 New Orleans, with Whitman, future filibuster William Walker, African-French daguerreotypist Jules Lion, and Lion's teenage ward Anna as the main characters; premiered June 2016 at Boston Playwrights' Theatre, directed by Jaime Carrillo.
P]ast vicissitudes seem merely like a change of garments" to the daguerreotypist (2:180), who, "as the representative of many compeers in his native land" (2.
In the 1840s, the Philadelphian daguerreotypist brothers William and Frederick Langenheim adapted a method invented by Frenchman Niepce de St.
There the Boston-based daguerreotypist John Adams Whipple, working with HCO director William Cranch Bond and his son George, spent several years in the late 1840s and early 1850s trying to take successful daguerreotypes through the HCO's 15-inch Great Refractor.
A young Paris daguerreotypist, Andre-Adolphe-Eugene Disderi (1819-1889) had invented a camera that would take eight exposures on a single photographic plate, a system he patented in 1854.
It should come as no surprise that only eighty days after this meeting, a group of French painters and scholars led by Horace Vernet, an Orientalist genre painter who had traveled to Algeria with the French Army in 1833, and the Daguerreotypist Goupil-Fesquet went to Egypt to photograph Egyptian antiquity, nor is it a coincidence that as early as 1846, Daguerre's British counterpart, William Henry Fox Talbot, published a pamphlet titled "The Talbotype Applied to hieroglyphics" which was distributed among archaeologists and Orientalists.
In 1845, African-American daguerreotypist, James Presley Ball (1825-1905?
Twenty-one chapters written by 19 academics and independent scholars, historians, librarians, archivists, and film and documentary professionals tell the stories of key figures, from the first Rocky Mountain daguerreotypist in 1851, to the region's landscape pioneers, portraitists, silent filmmakers, theater commercial producers, fine arts photographers, and photojournalists.
A French daguerreotypist follows a woman to a remote country house,
In a dramatic scene near the end of Seven Gables, the reader witnesses Holgrave, the reclusive daguerreotypist, declare his long-concealed love for Phoebe, the Pyncheons' country cousin, who has just returned to the old mansion to find the corpse of Jaffrey Pyncheon lounging in a chair.
In "Yang," a resourceful daguerreotypist comes up with a way to reassure the narrator's mother that he and his twin brother--a casualty of war--are all right.