dammit


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dam·mit

 (dăm′ĭt)
interj.
Used to express anger, irritation, contempt, or disappointment.

[Alteration of damn it.]

dammit

(ˈdæmɪt)
interj
a contracted form of damn it

dam•mit

(ˈdæm ɪt)

interj.
damn it (used as a mild expletive).
[1905]
Translations

dammit

[ˈdæmɪt] EXCL¡maldita sea!
as near as dammit (Brit) → casi, por un pelo

dammit

[ˈdæmɪt] exclzut!

dammit

interj (inf)verdammt (inf), → Teufel noch mal (inf); it weighs 2 kilos as near as dammites wiegt so gut wie 2 Kilo

dammit

[ˈdæmɪt] excl (fam) → maledizione!
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
It is not my design, therefore, to vituperate my deceased friend, Toby Dammit. He was a sad dog, it is true, and a dog's death it was that he died; but he himself was not to blame for his vices.
Through this latter most ungentlemanly practice, the ruin which I had predicted to Toby Dammit overtook him at last.
Poverty was another vice which the peculiar physical deficiency of Dammit's mother had entailed upon her son.
This latter form seemed to please him best; -- perhaps because it involved the least risk; for Dammit had become excessively parsimonious.
Dammit indulged himself in some very equivocal behavior.
Did I still think him baby Dammit? Did I mean to say any thing against his character?
Not so upon those of the unhappy Dammit, who offered to bet the Devil his head that I was hipped.
"Dammit," observed I -- although this sounded very much like an oath, than which nothing was further from my thoughts -- "Dammit," I suggested -- "the gentleman says 'ahem!'"
through and through with a Paixhan bomb, or knocked him in the head with the "Poets and Poetry of America," he could hardly have been more discomfited than when I addressed him with those simple words: "Dammit, what are you about?- don't you hear?
He left his station at the nook of the bridge, limped forward with a gracious air, took Dammit by the hand and shook it cordially, looking all the while straight up in his face with an air of the most unadulterated benignity which it is possible for the mind of man to imagine.
"I am quite sure you will win it, Dammit," said he, with the frankest of all smiles, "but we are obliged to have a trial, you know, for the sake of mere form."
"I ain' ga no money, dammit," he shouted, in a dismal voice.