damnatory


Also found in: Thesaurus.

dam·na·to·ry

 (dăm′nə-tôr′ē)
adj.
Threatening with or expressing condemnation; damning.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

damnatory

(ˈdæmnətərɪ; -trɪ)
adj
threatening or occasioning condemnation
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dam•na•to•ry

(ˈdæm nəˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i)

adj.
conveying, expressing, or causing condemnation; damning.
[1675–85; < Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.damnatory - threatening with damnation
inculpative, inculpatory - causing blame to be imputed to
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
I had cut my knuckles against the pale young gentleman's teeth, and I twisted my imagination into a thousand tangles, as I devised incredible ways of accounting for that damnatory circumstance when I should be haled before the Judges.
Tulliver, there was not more rascality than in the shape of his stiff shirt-collar, though this too along with his nose, might have become fraught with damnatory meaning when once the rascality was ascertained.
The JIT report that was deliberately leaked to the media before it was released makes damnatory reading.