dancing

(redirected from dancingly)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

dance

 (dăns)
v. danced, danc·ing, danc·es
v.intr.
1. To move rhythmically usually to music, using prescribed or improvised steps and gestures.
2. Zoology To perform a specialized set of movements to communicate chiefly with other members of the same species.
3.
a. To move or leap about excitedly.
b. To bob up and down or move about rapidly: The leaves danced in the wind.
c. To appear to flash or twinkle: eyes that danced with merriment.
4. Informal To speak or behave in an evasive or vacillating manner: danced around the issue.
v.tr.
1. To engage in or perform (a dance).
2. To lead (someone) in a dance.
3. To cause to move up and down quickly or lightly: danced the child on her knee.
n.
1.
a. A series of motions and steps, such as the waltz or tango, usually performed to music.
b. The act or an instance of dancing: May I have this dance?
c. The music composed or played for a certain kind of dance or for a particular dance.
d. The art of dancing: studied dance in college.
2. A party or gathering of people for dancing.
3. Zoology An act of communication by dancing: a peacock's courtship dance.
Idiom:
dance attendance on
To attend to or try to please (someone) with eagerness or obsequiousness.

[Middle English dauncen, from Old French danser, perhaps of Germanic origin.]

danc′er n.
danc′ing·ly adv.

Dancing

See also performing.

a drama expressed in dance or with dance as an integral part of its content and form.
1. the art of composing dances for the stage, especially in conceiving and realizing the movements of the dancers.
2. the technique of representing dance movements through a notational scheme.
3. the art of dancing. Also called choregraphy, orchesography. — choreographer, n. — choreographic, adj.
a mania for dancing.
a striptease performer or exotic dancer.
choreography. Also orchesis, orchestics.
Rare. the act of dancing. — tripudiary, adj.

Dancing

 

See Also: AGILITY, INSULTS, WORDS OF PRAISE

  1. As light on your feet as a fairy —Rita Mae Brown

    See Also: LIGHTNESS

  2. As limber as a couple of Yale pass-keys (addressed to a dancer) —O. Henry
  3. Danced like a faun —O. Henry

    O. Henry was well known for perverting and extending existing sayings. This one can be traced to Robert Lowell’s “Dancing like naked fauns too glad for shame.”

  4. Danced like a wave —Dame Edith Sitwell
  5. Danced like a wet dream —Martin Amis
  6. Danced like sandflies —Margaret Atwood
  7. Danced like something dark and slithery from the Argentine —P. G. Wodehouse
  8. (People) danced, moving their bodies like thick rope —Susan Richards Shreve
  9. Dancers swaying like wet washing in a high wind —Lawrence Durrell
  10. Dances like a Mack truck —Cornell Woolrich
  11. Dances like an angel —Joseph Addison
  12. (Sometimes I think that) dancing, like youth, is wasted on the young —Max Lerner
  13. Dancing with her must be a good deal like moving the piano or something —Ring Lardner
  14. (Helga Danzing danced just the way she looked: big, clumsy, almost impossible to lead,) dancing with her was like pushing a weight uphill —Abraham Rothberg
  15. (You’ve got) a foot movement like a baby hippopotamus trying to sidestep a jab from a humming-bird … and your knees are about as limber as a couple of Yale pass-keys —O. Henry
  16. Pirouetting like a Baryshnikov —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  17. Sailed like a coquettish yacht convoyed by a stately cruiser —O. Henry
  18. You dance like there’s a stone in your shoe —John Updike
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dancing - taking a series of rhythmical steps (and movements) in time to musicdancing - taking a series of rhythmical steps (and movements) in time to music
sidestep - a step to one side (as in boxing or dancing)
diversion, recreation - an activity that diverts or amuses or stimulates; "scuba diving is provided as a diversion for tourists"; "for recreation he wrote poetry and solved crossword puzzles"; "drug abuse is often regarded as a form of recreation"
adagio - a slow section of a pas de deux requiring great skill and strength by the dancers
break dance, break dancing - a form of solo dancing that involves rapid acrobatic moves in which different parts of the body touch the ground; normally performed to the rhythm of rap music
courante - a court dance of the 16th century; consisted of short advances and retreats
nauch, nautch, nautch dance - an intricate traditional dance in India performed by professional dancing girls
pavan, pavane - a stately court dance of the 16th and 17th centuries
phrase - dance movements that are linked in a single choreographic sequence
saraband - a stately court dance of the 17th and 18th centuries; in slow time
skank - a rhythmic dance to reggae music performed by bending forward and extending the hands while bending the knees
slam dance, slam dancing - a form of dancing in which dancers slam into one another; normally performed to punk rock
hoofing, step dancing - dancing in which the steps are more important than gestures or postures
toe dance, toe dancing - a dance performed on tiptoe
choreography, stage dancing - a show involving artistic dancing
pas seul, variation - (ballet) a solo dance or dance figure
pas de deux, duet - (ballet) a dance for two people (usually a ballerina and a danseur noble)
pas de trois - (ballet) a dance for three people
pas de quatre - (ballet) a dance for four people
social dancing - dancing as part of a social occasion
mambo - a Latin American dance similar in rhythm to the rumba
ceremonial dance, ritual dance, ritual dancing - a dance that is part of a religious ritual
tap - a small metal plate that attaches to the toe or heel of a shoe (as in tap dancing)
performing arts - arts or skills that require public performance
busker - a person who entertains people for money in public places (as by singing or dancing), usually while asking for money
jive - dance to jive music; dance the jive
trip the light fantastic, trip the light fantastic toe, dance - move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance; "My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio"
clog - dance a clog dance
tap dance - perform a tap dance
belly dance - perform a belly dance
heel - perform with the heels; "heel that dance"
shimmy - dance a shimmy
Translations
tančenítanectaneční
dansdanse-
tanssiminen
plesanje
dans
踊ること
tancovanie
plesanje
dansande
การเต้นรำ
sự nhảy múa

dancing

[ˈdɑːnsɪŋ]
A. Nbaile m
B. CPD dancing girl Nbailarina f
dancing partner Npareja f de baile
dancing shoes NPL (gen) → zapatos mpl de baile; (for ballet) → zapatillas fpl de ballet

dancing

[ˈdɑːnsɪŋ] ndanse fdancing class n (= dancing lesson) → cours m de dansedancing partner ncavalier/ière m/fdancing shoes npl [men] → escarpins mpl; [women] → chaussons mpl de danse

dancing

nTanzen nt
attrTanz-; dancing dervishtanzender Derwisch; dancing shoeTanzschuh m; put on your dancing shoes! (fig)mach dich hübsch or zurecht!

dancing

:
dancing girl
nTänzerin f
dancing master
mTanzlehrer m
dancing partner
nTanzpartner(in) m(f)
dancing step
nTanzschritt m

dancing

[ˈdɑːnsɪŋ] nballo

dance

(daːns) verb
1. to move in time to music by ma-king a series of rhythmic steps. She began to dance; Can you dance the waltz?
2. to move quickly up and down. The father was dancing the baby on his knee.
noun
1. a series of fixed steps made in time to music. Have you done this dance before?; (also adjective) dance music.
2. a social gathering at which people dance. We're going to a dance next Saturday.
ˈdancer noun
a ballet dancer.
ˈdancing noun
She likes dancing; (also adjective) dancing shoes.

dancing

رَقْص tanec dans Tanzen χορός baile tanssiminen danse plesanje ballo 踊ること danskunst dansing taniec dança танцы dansande การเต้นรำ danslı toplantı sự nhảy múa 跳舞
References in periodicals archive ?
Renato Balsadonna's enlarged Royal Opera Chorus relished the purely musical values of their contributions, now dancingly light, now impressively sonorous.
Indeed, Ravel never seemed far from Philippe Jordan's mind's ear in his dancingly prismatic account of the score, executed with precision and power by the splendid orchestra.
Their stories are profoundly sad and dancingly happy, constricting and gloriously liberating, generating both despair and hope for the future of the Catholic priesthood and the church.