dangling participle


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Related to dangling participle: dangling modifier

dangling participle

n
(Grammar) grammar a participle intended to modify a noun but having the wrong grammatical relationship to it as for example having left in the sentence Having left Europe for good, Peter's future seemed bleak indeed. Also called: misplaced modifier

dan′gling par′ticiple


n.
a participle or participial phrase, often found at the beginning of a sentence, that appears from its position to modify an element of the sentence other than the one it was intended to modify, as plunging in Plunging hundreds of feet into the gorge, we saw Yosemite Falls.
usage: Most usage guides warn against the dangling participle, advising revision of any sentence containing one. The example above would be recast as We saw Yosemite Falls plunging hundreds of feet into the gorge. dangling participles have long appeared in literary English and today are commonplace in speech and edited writing: Looking to the west, a deep river valley can be seen. Obviously, the river valley is not looking to the west, but here the sentence is clear and stylistically unexceptionable. When a dangling participle creates confusion or unintentional silliness (Having finished our breakfast, the boat was loaded and launched), then revision becomes necessary. Regardless of their position, certain participial constructions are never felt to be dangling. Some of these are simply independent phrases, and others function as conjunctions or prepositions: Generally speaking, the report is true. She looks wonderful, considering she has been through so much. Assuming congressional approval, the bill will go to the president Friday. See also misplaced modifier.

dangling participle

A participle that is not correctly related to the word it is supposed to modify, for example “flying” in Flying home that night, the weather broke.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dangling participle - a participle (usually at the beginning of a sentence) apparently modifying a word other than the word intended: e.g., `flying across the country' in `flying across the country the Rockies came into view'
dangling modifier, misplaced modifier - a word or phrase apparently modifying an unintended word because of its placement in a sentence: e.g., `when young' in `when young, circuses appeal to all of us'
References in periodicals archive ?
Trying to figure out the difference between a split infinitive and a dangling participle.
Unfortunately for UCLA, they are the dangling participle in the statement the Trojans intend to make.
Although the book is attractively produced, it is marred by a number of stylistic infelicities and typesetting errors that should have been caught in the proofreading process: a dangling participle ("the next question that needs to be asked, having established the function of the imperative") (p.
With due respect to Fay Weldon and her distaste for the hanging, dangling participle which does little more than promulgate the 'disease of lost meaning' (NZ Listener, June 18--24, 2005), these are changing times for the NZ Journal of Physiotherapy.
He needs us to take the novelist as seriously as the biographer has, in a 600-page book that includes every dangling participle, muddled vehemence, and tawdry tittle-tattle.
Other vexing verbal constructions include infinitives functioning as adjectives ("I need a book to read") and the ever-insidious dangling participle.
take a multiple-choice quiz to see if you really know a misplaced modifier from a dangling participle.
Forget the dangling participle in the next-to-last paragraph of the letter.
Compounding the difficulties is a fair sprinkling of typos and grammatical errors (Kelsey is partial to the dangling participle as well as the fragment, and his complicated sentences sometimes lead to errors in subject-verb agreement).
In the ``Scarface'' tradition, the profanity that begins with ``F'' is used as a verb, a noun, an adjective, an adverb and, most definitely, a dangling participle.
Unmasking the murderer proves much more challenging than finding dangling participles, so Em recruits fellow English professor Lenny Jenkins for assistance.
It's littered with typos, dangling participles, and confusions of fact.