dangling participle

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Related to dangling participles: dangling modifier

dangling participle

n
(Grammar) grammar a participle intended to modify a noun but having the wrong grammatical relationship to it as for example having left in the sentence Having left Europe for good, Peter's future seemed bleak indeed. Also called: misplaced modifier
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dan′gling par′ticiple


n.
a participle or participial phrase, often found at the beginning of a sentence, that appears from its position to modify an element of the sentence other than the one it was intended to modify, as plunging in Plunging hundreds of feet into the gorge, we saw Yosemite Falls.
usage: Most usage guides warn against the dangling participle, advising revision of any sentence containing one. The example above would be recast as We saw Yosemite Falls plunging hundreds of feet into the gorge. dangling participles have long appeared in literary English and today are commonplace in speech and edited writing: Looking to the west, a deep river valley can be seen. Obviously, the river valley is not looking to the west, but here the sentence is clear and stylistically unexceptionable. When a dangling participle creates confusion or unintentional silliness (Having finished our breakfast, the boat was loaded and launched), then revision becomes necessary. Regardless of their position, certain participial constructions are never felt to be dangling. Some of these are simply independent phrases, and others function as conjunctions or prepositions: Generally speaking, the report is true. She looks wonderful, considering she has been through so much. Assuming congressional approval, the bill will go to the president Friday. See also misplaced modifier.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

dangling participle

A participle that is not correctly related to the word it is supposed to modify, for example “flying” in Flying home that night, the weather broke.”
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dangling participle - a participle (usually at the beginning of a sentence) apparently modifying a word other than the word intended: e.g., `flying across the country' in `flying across the country the Rockies came into view'
dangling modifier, misplaced modifier - a word or phrase apparently modifying an unintended word because of its placement in a sentence: e.g., `when young' in `when young, circuses appeal to all of us'
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Better copy editing could have resolved some of the problems, such as the random substitution of colons for semicolons, excessive use of the passive voice, dangling participles, incomplete sentences, and run-on sentences that lack parallelism.
She can spot dangling participles or repetitive syntax a mile away.
While I'm on the topic of bars and dangling participles, Trey Higgens forwarded to me a Facebook post from a woman in Gainesville, Florida.
Unmasking the murderer proves much more challenging than finding dangling participles, so Em recruits fellow English professor Lenny Jenkins for assistance.
I First the context: There are several buses that leave Curve Lake every morning and return every afternoon bearing the children of our community off into the lands beyond our borders--about 20 minutes--to learn about the importance of pie charts, dangling participles, and to master iambic pentameter.
It's that little grammatical error called a "dangler." You may remember an English teacher calling them "dangling participles." If you begin a sentence with a descriptive phrase, it's supposed to describe the subject of the part that follows--otherwise it "dangles." Usually, in fact, it does something hilarious.
Copy editors (those who are skilled in corralling commas and deleting dangling participles) will fix a few problems; major surgery, however, always belongs with the author.
It's littered with typos, dangling participles, and confusions of fact.
Exceptional parents are very clever when it comes to misplaced hyphens, commas, and dangling participles. They have seen how an intentional or unintentional hyphen, comma, or last minute insertion of "except" has changed the playing field, put them on the outs, and placed them back-in-the-back of the line.