dark lantern


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dark lantern

n.
A lantern whose light can be blocked, as by a sliding panel.

dark lantern

n
a lantern having a sliding shutter or panel to dim or hide the light

dark′ lan′tern


n.
a lantern having an opening with a shutter that can be slid across the opening to obscure the light.
[1640–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dark lantern - a lantern with a single opening and a sliding panel that can be closed to conceal the light
lantern - light in a transparent protective case
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References in classic literature ?
Suddenly, the darkness was made visible by a small dark lantern and Raoul instinctively stepped backward as though to escape the scrutiny of a secret enemy.
The nigger had a dark lantern in his hand, and was throwing the light down the steep incline.
Pickwick, with many smiles and various other indications of great self-satisfaction, produced from one of his coat pockets a dark lantern, with which he had specially provided himself for the occasion, and the great mechanical beauty of which he proceeded to explain to Mr.
Now listen, you young limb,' whispered Sikes, drawing a dark lantern from his pocket, and throwing the glare full on Oliver's face; 'I'm a going to put you through there.
The man in uniform whom he had sent to fetch this equipage then handed him up a dark lantern at his request, and when he had given a few directions to the driver, we rattled away.
Boxtel put a lighted dark lantern into his pocket, mounted the ladder, and slipped into the dry-room.
And there I stood staring at him, in that empty room; and there he stood with his dark lantern, laughing at me.
He then lit a dark lantern and pointed to a coffin.
Holmes picked one out, but it was as hard to read by the flickering fire, and he drew out his little dark lantern, for it was too dangerous, with Milverton in the next room, to switch on the electric light.
The constable moved away, flashing as he passed the light of his dark lantern, merely for form's sake, at the shop window.
A pickax and spade were lying in the bottom of the boat, with a dark lantern, and a stone bottle of good Dutch courage,[1] in which honest Sam no doubt put even more faith than Dr.