dark matter


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Related to dark matter: antimatter, Dark energy

dark matter

n.
Matter that emits little or no detectable radiation of its own, postulated to account for observed gravitational forces that affect astronomical objects but have no observable sources. Dark matter is thought to be part of the missing mass.

dark matter

n
(Astronomy) astronomy matter known to make up perhaps 90% of the mass of the universe, but not detectable by its absorption or emission of electromagnetic radiation

dark′ mat`ter


n.
a hypothetical form of matter invisible to electromagnetic radiation, postulated to account for gravitational forces observed in the universe.
[1920–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dark matter - (cosmology) a hypothetical form of matter that is believed to make up 90 percent of the universe; it is invisible (does not absorb or emit light) and does not collide with atomic particles but exerts gravitational force
matter - that which has mass and occupies space; "physicists study both the nature of matter and the forces which govern it"
cosmogeny, cosmogony, cosmology - the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution and structure of the universe
weakly interacting massive particle, WIMP - a hypothetical subatomic particle of large mass that interacts weakly with ordinary matter through gravitation; postulated as a constituent of the dark matter of the universe
Translations

dark matter

n (Astron) → dunkle Materie, Dunkelmaterie f
References in periodicals archive ?
At the distance to the centre of our galaxy, the emission from many thousands of these whirling dense stars could be blending together to imitate the smoothly distributed signal we expect from dark matter," Dr.
A research team of multiple institutes, including the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and University of Tokyo, released an unprecedentedly wide and sharp dark matter map based on the newly obtained imaging data by Hyper Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope.
In the case of individual galaxies, the dark matter is believed to exist in a halo around the galaxy.
While some scientists continue down the road of increasingly larger detectors designed to catch the particles, others are beginning to consider a broader landscape of possibilities for what dark matter might be.
If it wasn't for dark matter, that gas would have drifted off into space.
Galaxy clusters, which consist of thousands of galaxies, are important for exploring dark matter because they reside in a region where such matter is much denser than average.
The existence of dark matter is known from its gravitational effects on visible matter, radiation, and the large-scale structure of the universe.
We used to think that dark matter sits around, minding its own business," said Dr Richard Massey, a Royal Society research fellow and member of Durham University's Institute for Computational Cosmology.
Kevork Abazajian, Nicolas Canac, Shunsaku Horiuchi and Manoj Kaplinghat analyzed data from NASA's space-borne Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and found that only a narrow range of dark matter models can produce an excess of gamma rays coming from the Milky Way.
A detector attached to the International Space Station has so far failed to find any dark matter either.
They seem to bear the signature of collisions between atoms of dark matter, the mysterious "stuff" that cannot be seen or detected directly but which binds the cosmos together.
That makes detecting dark matter next to impossible.