darkroom

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dark·room

 (därk′ro͞om′, -ro͝om′)
n.
A room in which photographic materials are processed, either in complete darkness or with a safelight.

darkroom

(ˈdɑːkˌruːm; -ˌrʊm)
n
(Photography) a room in which photographs are processed in darkness or safe light

dark•room

(ˈdɑrkˌrum, -ˌrʊm)

n.
a room in which film, photographic paper, etc., is made, handled, or developed and from which the actinic rays of light are excluded.
[1835–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.darkroom - a room in which photographs are developeddarkroom - a room in which photographs are developed
room - an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling; "the rooms were very small but they had a nice view"
Translations
temná komora
pimiö
darkroom
sötétkamra

darkroom

[ˈdɑːkrʊm] N (Phot) → cuarto m oscuro

darkroom

[ˈdɑːrkrʊm ˈdɑːrkruːm] n (PHOTOGRAPHY)chambre f noiredark-skinned [ˌdɑːrkˈskɪnd] adj [person, race] → de couleur

darkroom

[ˈdɑːkrum] ncamera oscura
References in periodicals archive ?
Fluorescence microscopes have generally been operated in darkrooms to reduce imaging noise and observe weakly fluorescent light.
I have been passionately keen on photography from my early teens and after four years in the RAF as a photographer, I was fortunate to get a job in the darkrooms of Vogue Studios where I worked with many very talented photographers including David Bailey.
"I blew that up and it went on to be used on front pages everywhere and won awards." Alun who now lives in Ascot, Berkshire, with his wife Sara explained how his childhood passion for photography turned into an amazing career which has allowed him to travel the world and be part of the transformation of photojournalism from the days when images had to be processed in darkrooms to the digital transmission of pictures.
In Margate Nelson was transforming a derelict building for Turner Contemporary, reconfiguring it into a cannabis farm and a complex of photographic darkrooms. It included a labyrinth of hydroponic water pipes, reflective walls and several thousand watts of halogen light.
At times the debate gets heated to the point of bloodshed, and it's worth remembering that a lot of the digital trickery is only replicating what photographers and printers have been doing in darkrooms since the 1850s.
"While school photography departments must also acknowledge and adapt to the digital world, it's still far less expensive to build wet darkrooms than high-end digital workstations."
Since 1981, however, the digital stream has reinvented the camera and emptied the darkrooms. Our sunlit world now gets recorded by machines handling two switches--on and off.
They are running courses which will teach people about darkrooms, how to take black and white photographs, how to develop photographs and how to print photographs.
It still isn't, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, which includes no mention of the camera in its definition of the word "photography.") But light is only half the story, for darkness--the obscurity in the camera obscura--is also needed to make a photograph: both the darkness of darkrooms and camera interiors, and the occlusion of light that is necessarily part of any photographic inscription.
The company's self-contained mobile darkrooms are equipped for both mainline and tie-in radiography, giving immediate results.
In the past, the hobby was split between those who took the occasional holiday or family snap and those who built their own darkrooms and spent their time in dimly-lit cupboards under the stairs, up to their elbows in smelly chemicals.
Now computer technology is making chemical darkrooms obsolete for all such work.