dartle

dartle

(ˈdɑːtəl)
vb
archaic to move swiftly and repeatedly
References in classic literature ?
She was introduced as Miss Dartle, and both Steerforth and his mother called her Rosa.
That's very true,' returned Miss Dartle. 'But isn't it, though?
You mean it's not!' returned Miss Dartle. 'Well, I'm very glad to hear it!
'How very nice!' exclaimed Miss Dartle. 'What a comfort!
Her own views of every question, and her correction of everything that was said to which she was opposed, Miss Dartle insinuated in the same way: sometimes, I could not conceal from myself, with great power, though in contradiction even of Steerforth.
But it was in reference to the tone in which he had spoken of 'that sort of people', that Miss Dartle, whose sparkling eyes had been watchful of us, now broke in again.
'Really!' said Miss Dartle. 'Well, I don't know, now, when I have been better pleased than to hear that.
I believed that Steerforth had said what he had, in jest, or to draw Miss Dartle out; and I expected him to say as much when she was gone, and we two were sitting before the fire.
Miss Dartle played backgammon as eagerly as she did everything else.
While we were talking, he more than once called me Daisy; which brought Miss Dartle out again.
'Oh!' said Miss Dartle. 'Now I am glad to know that!
I sat down in a great chair upon the hearth to meditate on my happiness; and had enjoyed the contemplation of it for some time, when I found a likeness of Miss Dartle looking eagerly at me from above the chimney-piece.