data dictionary


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data dictionary

n
(Computer Science) computing an index of data held in a database and used to assist in the access to data. Also called: data directory
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Although other initiatives have dealt with preservation metadata for digital resources, they have been implementation-specific or theoretical, but the PREMIS data dictionary is a set of semantic units (i.e., metadata elements) that are implementation-independent, rigorously defined, and practically oriented.
They simply adopted XBRL GL as the common "data dictionary."
The purpose of this data dictionary is to define a standard set of metadata elements for digital images.
The extension of the program to software vendor certification and development of a data dictionary enhances the ability of utilities, engineers and applications developers to implement standard codes and procedures.
Once the data dictionary has been created, this data file is uploaded to each iPAQ Pocket PC and used by the TerraSync software to collect and maintain GIS data, such as point, line, or polygon features and their associated conditional assessment information.
The commercial real estate finance industry took an important step toward greater market efficiency with the release of the Exposure Draft of the Originations Data Dictionary by the MISMO Commercial Working Group.
It has dual base currency--where three currencies can be held against any transaction--and a multi-lingual data dictionary so that users can alter terms to suit their needs.
Danaher adds, "The principal caveat that needs to be understood about XBRL is that it's impossible to say with any degree of certainty that any particular element in the data dictionary for a given company is 100% comparable with the same element for another company, even for a direct competitor in the same industry.
These applications -- the Clinical Data Repository, Healthcare Data Dictionary, Enterprise Master Patient Index, Clinical Workstation Application, Clinical Documentation Application, Clinical Pathways Software, and Alert Management Software -- work seamlessly to integrate data from multiple care locations into individual, longitudinal patient records.
It works much like a printer driver by transforming attribute contents, such as engineering units and domain types specified by a data dictionary, into dimension-less numbers and special domain types that a controller will recognize.
Integrating care includes many features, among them instituting standard means of collecting and storing data about members and patients; standardizing contracting so that every operating unit of the IDS works under a standard contract with any given payer; cultivating a standard clinical and managerial culture that includes all providers and managers of facilities; standardizing the data dictionary of electronic transaction systems so that procedure costs, formularies, and laboratory reports have the same consistent terms throughout the organization; and vesting in an information systems council for the IDS the power to dictate to operating units that they adhere to standards set by the organization for information and communication systems.
The establishment and maintenance of a Data Dictionary to support either data flow or data modeling techniques requires significant manual labor and may account for its placing second in the results.