dative

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da·tive

 (dā′tĭv)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being the grammatical case that marks the recipient of action, that often indicates the indirect object of the verb, and that can be used with prepositions or other function words corresponding in meaning to English to and for.
n.
1. The dative case.
2. A word or form in the dative case.

[Middle English datif, from Latin (cāsus) datīvus, (case) of giving (translation of Greek dotikē ptōsis), from datus, past participle of dare, to give; see dō- in Indo-European roots.]

da′tive·ly adv.

dative

(ˈdeɪtɪv) grammar
adj
(Grammar) denoting a case of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives used to express the indirect object, to identify the recipients, and for other purposes
n
(Grammar)
a. the dative case
b. a word or speech element in this case
[C15: from Latin datīvus, from dare to give; translation of Greek dotikos]
datival adj
ˈdatively adv

da•tive

(ˈdeɪ tɪv)
adj.
1. of or designating a grammatical case that typically indicates the indirect object of a verb or the object of certain prepositions.
n.
2. the dative case.
3. a word or other form in the dative case.
[1400–50; datif < Latin datīvus (casus) dative (case) <dat(us) given (see date1)]
da•ti′val (-ˈtaɪ vəl) adj.
da′tive•ly, adv.

dative

A noun case that indicates the indirect object of a verb.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dative - the category of nouns serving as the indirect object of a verb
oblique, oblique case - any grammatical case other than the nominative
Translations
dativdativnítřetí pád
datiividatiivinen
dativ
részeshatározó
þágufall
naudininkas
dajalnik
dativ

dative

[ˈdeɪtɪv]
A. ADJdativo
B. N (also dative case) → dativo m

dative

[ˈdeɪtɪv] n (GRAMMAR)datif m

dative

nDativ m; in the dativeim Dativ
adjDativ-, dativisch; dative objectDativobjekt nt; the dative caseder Dativ

dative

[ˈdeɪtɪv]
1. adjdativo/a
2. ndativo
in the dative → al dativo
References in classic literature ?
Very well--then THE rain is DER Regen, if it is simply in the quiescent state of being MENTIONED, without enlargement or discussion--Nominative case; but if this rain is lying around, in a kind of a general way on the ground, it is then definitely located, it is DOING SOMETHING--that is, RESTING (which is one of the German grammar's ideas of doing something), and this throws the rain into the Dative case, and makes it DEM Regen.
For instance, if one is casually referring to a house, HAUS, or a horse, PFERD, or a dog, HUND, he spells these words as I have indicated; but if he is referring to them in the Dative case, he sticks on a foolish and unnecessary E and spells them HAUSE, PFERDE, HUNDE.
In the first place, I would leave out the Dative case.
It would be an easy map if that were all, but there is also first day at school, religion, fathers, the round pond, needle-work, murders, hangings, verbs that take the dative, chocolate pudding day, getting into braces, say ninety-nine, three-pence for pulling out your tooth yourself, and so on, and either these are part of the island or they are another map showing through, and it is all rather confusing, especially as nothing will stand still.
He very soon set down poor Tom as a thoroughly stupid lad; for though by hard labor he could get particular declensions into his brain, anything so abstract as the relation between cases and terminations could by no means get such a lodgment there as to enable him to recognize a chance genitive or dative. This struck Mr.
In some cases of emotive bias, our reason is quite completely overcome and things do appear to us falsely; we become spoiled datives. Often enough, however, our own reason is able to let the truth emerge, but because of our emotion or interest we may not want to acknowledge it, and in such cases we may act and speak mendaciously.
In order to generalize animate and inanimate datives in ditransitive constructions, Goldberg prefers using the role of Recipient rather than of Possessor to refer to them.
(2.) Compare Kellens' assumption of quotations to explain the sporadic datives in Y1.11, 1.12, 1.18, etc.
The highly variable treatment in how languages lexicalize different types of transactions, and in how grammars deal with three-participant events, suggests that human cognitive and linguistic abilities are challenged when it comes to representing interactions between three participants (consider EisenbeiB 2002 and the references therein on children's acquisition of datives).
Among their topics are some observations on the usage of adnominal genitives and datives in Middle Bulgarian Church Slavonic, possessive resultative constructions in Old and Middle Polish, mechanisms of word order change in Serbian during the 12th and 13th centuries, triangulation in the domain of clause linkage and propositional marking, and relativization strategies in Slovene: diachrony between language use and language description.