dawning

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dawn

 (dôn)
n.
1. The time each morning at which daylight first begins.
2. A first appearance; a beginning: the dawn of history. See Synonyms at beginning.
intr.v. dawned, dawn·ing, dawns
1. To begin to become light in the morning.
2. To begin to appear or develop; emerge.
3. To begin to be perceived or understood: Realization of the danger soon dawned on us.

[From Middle English daunen, to dawn, probably a back-formation from dauning, daybreak, alteration of dauing, from Old English dagung, from dagian, to dawn; see agh- in Indo-European roots.]

dawning

(ˈdɔːnɪŋ)
adj
gradually taking shape in a person's consciousness: a dawning awareness.
n
another word for dawn
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dawning - the first light of daydawning - the first light of day; "we got up before dawn"; "they talked until morning"
time of day, hour - clock time; "the hour is getting late"

dawning

noun
The first appearance of daylight in the morning:
Translations
بُزوغ الفَجْر
rozbřesksvítání
begyndelsefrembrud
virradat
upphaf

dawning

[ˈdɔːnɪŋ]
A. ADJ [hope etc] → naciente
B. N (= beginning) → albores mpl
the dawning of the space agelos albores de la era espacial
the first dawning of hopeel primer atisbo or rayo de esperanza

dawning

[ˈdɔːnɪŋ]
1. adj (day, hope) → appena nato/a
2. n = dawn 1b

dawn

(doːn) verb
(especially of daylight) to begin to appear. A new day has dawned. See also dawn on below.
noun
1. the very beginning of a day; very early morning. We must get up at dawn.
2. the very beginning of something. the dawn of civilization.
ˈdawning noun
the act of beginning. the dawning of a new day / a new age.
dawn on
to become suddenly clear to (a person). It suddenly dawned on me what he had meant.
References in classic literature ?
The beams of the cold northern moon, mingling strangely with the dawning light, clothe the snowy plains in hues of livid gray.
And it is all so simple, pale, and crude in the cold white light of this morning which I feel is dawning for me.
Probably the literary fine world, which is always rubbing shoulders with the other fine world, and bringing off a little of its powder and perfume, was then dawning upon me, and I was wishing to be of it, and to like the things that it liked; I am not so anxious to do it now.
Oh, how many seas round about me, what dawning human futures
I succeeded in extracting a grunt; and presently, he drew back his arm, shook himself all over like a Newfoundland dog just from the water, and sat up in bed, stiff as a pike-staff, looking at me, and rubbing his eyes as if he did not altogether remember how I came to be there, though a dim consciousness of knowing something about me seemed slowly dawning over him.