deacon


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dea·con

 (dē′kən)
n.
1. A cleric ranking just below a priest in the Anglican, Eastern Orthodox, and Roman Catholic churches.
2. A lay assistant to a Protestant minister.
3. Used as a title prefixed to the surname of such a person: Deacon Brown.

[Middle English deken, from Old English dīacon, from Late Latin diāconus, perhaps from Greek diākonos, attendant, minister.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

deacon

(ˈdiːkən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (in the Roman Catholic and other episcopal churches) an ordained minister ranking immediately below a priest
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (in Protestant churches) a lay official appointed or elected to assist the minister, esp in secular affairs
3. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) Scot the president of an incorporated trade or body of craftsmen in a burgh
[Old English, ultimately from Greek diakonos servant]
ˈdeaconˌship n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dea•con

(ˈdi kən)

n.
1. (in hierarchical churches) a member of the clerical order next below that of a priest.
2. (in other churches) an appointed or elected officer having variously defined duties.
[before 900; Middle English deken, Old English diacon < Late Latin diāconus < Greek diakonos servant, minister, deacon]
dea′con•ship`, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deacon - a Protestant layman who assists the ministerdeacon - a Protestant layman who assists the minister
church officer - a church official
deaconess - a woman deacon
2.deacon - a cleric ranking just below a priest in Christian churches; one of the Holy Orders
clergyman, man of the cloth, reverend - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church
Holy Order, Order - (usually plural) the status or rank or office of a Christian clergyman in an ecclesiastical hierarchy; "theologians still disagree over whether `bishop' should or should not be a separate Order"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

deacon

noun
Related words
adjective diaconal
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
diakoni
助祭執事輔祭

deacon

[ˈdiːkən] Ndiácono m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

deacon

[ˈdiːkən] ndiacre m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

deacon

nDiakon m; (= elder)Kirchenälteste(r) m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

deacon

[ˈdiːkn] ndiacono
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
A young deacon, whose long back showed in two distinct halves through his thin undercassock, met him, and at once going to a little table at the wall read the exhortation.
AN Itinerant Preacher who had wrought hard in the moral vineyard for several hours whispered to a Holy Deacon of the local church:
that worships in Deacon Deuteronomy Coleman's meeting-house?
"Now, look here, old man, you must stay in bed, and I'll bring old Deacon in to have a look at you."
As he spoke he pointed his staff at a female figure on the path, in whom Goodman Brown recognized a very pious and exemplary dame, who had taught him his catechism in youth, and was still his moral and spiritual adviser, jointly with the minister and Deacon Gookin.
Eudoxy Morton ain't come yet; I hope to the land she will, or Mis' Deacon Milliken'll pitch the tunes where we can't reach 'em with a ladder; can't you pitch, afore she gits her breath and clears her throat?"
At this time the senior deacon was taken dangerously ill, and, being a childless widower, he was tended night and day by some of the younger brethren or sisters.
They were met by a deacon with a censer and by a servant who passed out on tiptoe without heeding them.
At all events, the health of the good town of Boston, so far as medicine had aught to do with it, had hitherto lain in the guardianship of an aged deacon and apothecary, whose piety and godly deportment were stronger testimonials in his favour than any that he could have produced in the shape of a diploma.
All the school- children, the singers and the firemen walked on the sidewalks, while in the middle of the street came first the custodian of the church with his halberd, then the beadle with a large cross, the teacher in charge of the boys and a sister escorting the little girls; three of the smallest ones, with curly heads, threw rose leaves into the air; the deacon with outstretched arms conducted the music; and two incense-bearers turned with each step they took toward the Holy Sacrament, which was carried by M.
A farm smokehouse had to be kept heavily padlocked, or even the colored deacon himself could not resist a ham when Providence showed him in a dream, or otherwise, where such a thing hung lonesome, and longed for someone to love.
He wore an injured air; it was as if a deacon had been accused of stealing.