dead drop


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Noun1.dead drop - a drop used for the clandestine exchange of intelligence information; "a dead drop avoids the need for an intelligence officer and a spy to be present at the same time"
drop - a predetermined hiding place for the deposit and distribution of illicit goods (such as drugs or stolen property)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said he paid for the drugs by wiring money to an account in Pakistan, after which he would be directed to dead drop sites in Bahrain where the product was located.
When you see our exhibits on basic tradecraft -- a "dead drop," a "signal site" -- once you learn what those things are, you can't take them out of your brain.
Another riveting read from a true master of the genre, "Dead Drop" showcases P.
Dupont, WA, March 04, 2018 --(PR.com)-- Redline Digital Solutions has launched an affiliate program for their online collaboration tool, Dead Drop.
Roman reaches at their agreed dead drop and finds a copy of the downloaded content from the microchip Jane had with her in Bradley Dynamics.
The boat ride through Traitor's Gate may have malfunctioned, as it just seemed to be a lot of floating around in darkness - and then the climactic Dead Drop ride was out of order.
The seed releases from the delivery cartridge at a rearward speed that matches the forward speed of the planter, resulting in a dead drop of the seed into the trench.
Nina Beier's contribution is Dead Drop, 2012, a leopard-print scarf placed on Isabella's bed, bringing to mind the leopard-skin cape she wore in a 1940 portrait in the apartment--as if, having finished posing, she had thrown it onto the bed.
Finally taking pity, he said, "You fish; I'll tell you when to strike." Turns out, the secret to the "dead drop" lies in the eyes: One sees, not feels, 80 to 90 percent of strikes.
IN tonight''s penultimate episode of Spooks (BBC1, 9pm), Ruth is approached by official council snooper Keith Deery, who claims to have uncovered covert activity when he spotted a woman leaving a 'dead drop' message on a park bench.
In tonight's penultimate episode, Ruth is approached by official council snooper Keith Deery, who believes he has uncovered covert activity when he spots a woman leaving a 'dead drop' message on a park bench.
The papers lift the lid on spying techniques such as a new high-tech spy-to-spy communications system used by the defendants: short-range wireless communications between laptop computers -a modern supplement for the old-style dead drop in a remote area and high-speed burst radio transmission.