deadwood

(redirected from dead wood)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to dead wood: get the axe

dead·wood

 (dĕd′wo͝od′)
n.
1. Dead wood, including fallen or standing trees, branches, and stumps.
2. One or more people or things considered as burdensome, superfluous, or serving no useful purpose: Management fired all the deadwood in the department as a cost-saving measure.
3. also dead wood Sports Fallen bowling pins that remain on the alley.
4. Nautical A timber or set of timbers helping to connect the keel of a vessel to the stem or the sternpost.

deadwood

(ˈdɛdˌwʊd)
n
1. (Forestry) dead trees or branches
2. informal a useless person; encumbrance
3. (Nautical Terms) nautical a filler piece between the keel and the stern of a wooden vessel

dead•wood

(ˈdɛdˌwʊd)

n.
1. dead branches or trees.
2. useless or extraneous persons or things.
3. a reinforcing construction located between the keel of a ship and the stem or sternpost.
4. bowling pins knocked down but not cleared from the alley.
[1720–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deadwood - a branch or a part of a tree that is deaddeadwood - a branch or a part of a tree that is dead
branch - a division of a stem, or secondary stem arising from the main stem of a plant
2.deadwood - someone or something that is unwanted and unneededdeadwood - someone or something that is unwanted and unneeded
redundance, redundancy - the attribute of being superfluous and unneeded; "the use of industrial robots created redundancy among workers"
Translations

deadwood

[ˈdedˌwʊd] N (= person) → persona f inútil; (= people) → gente f inútil; (= things) → cosas fpl inútiles
to get rid of the deadwood (in organization) → eliminar al personal inútil

deadwood

[ˈdɛdˌwʊd] n (also) (fig) → rami mpl secchi
References in classic literature ?
"There's lots o' dead wood as ought to be cut out," he said.
"A body might think this was dead wood, but I don't believe it is--down to th' root.
And, provided with a lentil, he lighted a fire of dead wood that crackled joyously.
and if he hasn’t got all the same as dead wood in his headworks, he knows summat of me.
My employment out of doors now was to collect the dead wood in the forest, bringing it in my hands or on my shoulders, or sometimes trailing a dead pine tree under each arm to my shed.
The grass was high and thick, affording feed for her horse and a bed for herself, and there was more than enough dead wood lying about the trees to furnish a good fire well through the night.
I had to keep guessing at the channel; I had to discern, mostly by inspiration, the signs of hidden banks; I watched for sunken stones; I was learning to clap my teeth smartly before my heart flew out, when I shaved by a fluke some infernal sly old snag that would have ripped the life out of the tin-pot steamboat and drowned all the pilgrims; I had to keep a look-out for the signs of dead wood we could cut up in the night for next day's steaming.
One of his hands was resting on a chunk of dead wood. Carefully, first feeling about him in the darkness to know that the full swing of his arm was clear, he raised the chunk of wood and threw it.
Chance, thou term'st thyself, but thou art nothing; thou inflamest everything with thy breath, crumblest mountains at thy approach, and suddenly art thyself destroyed at the presence of the Cross of dead wood behind which stand another Power invisible like thyself - whom thou deniest, perhaps, but whose avenging hand is on thee, and hurls thee in the dust dishonored and unnamed!
By heaven this dead wood has the better of my live flesh every way.
These hemmed them, in a very forest of hewn timber; from the entanglements, intricacies, and depths of which, as from among the boughs of a dead wood blighted for their phantom use, they kept their darksome and unwinking watch.
The smoke of the invisible fire was coming up again, was trailing, like a poisonous thick mist in some valley choked with dead wood. Already lazy wisps were beginning to curl upwards amongst the mass of splinters.