dead-heading


Also found in: Idioms.

dead-heading

A technique of removing old flowers once they start to fade. This prevents them looking unsightly and encourages the plant to produce further flushes of flowers.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
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The only time you might want to avoid dead-heading is for rose cultivars that bear hips in the autumn as these could then be harvested.
Cut backs REDUCE and thin dead foliage from borders, dead-heading plants such as geraniums to encourage fresh flowering.
Gardeners' World 8pm Monty Don cuts back and divides spring flowering plants, gives advice on the pruning, dead-heading and staking of roses and shows how to keep ponds looking good.
Q As we know, bedding plants need dead-heading to prolong flowering during the summer.
By midsummer, the first flush is usually coming to an end, so you'll need to tidy up shrub and bush varieties by dead-heading and removing clusters of faded flowers.
Very few flowers die gracefully and dead-heading regularly helps the whole show look better.
Dead-heading is a gardening term that refers to the removal of faded flowers after they have bloomed.
Prune old-fashioned roses and climbers after flowering, and when dead-heading cut the stem off just above a healthy leaf
They flower from mid-summer until autumn and benefit from regular dead-heading. For those who prefer a mixture of colours, go for 'Royal Bouquet', 'Showtime' and 'Sparkle Mixed'.
6Give roses a tidy-up, dead-heading, spraying where necessary and applying either rose fertiliser or sulphate of potash to toughen up the growth for winter.
They have started by dead-heading the plant life already there and will be choosing fruits and vegetables to grow and tend to on a weekly basis.