deadly nightshade


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deadly nightshade

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

deadly nightshade

n
(Plants) a poisonous Eurasian solanaceous plant, Atropa belladonna, having dull purple bell-shaped flowers and small very poisonous black berries. Also called: belladonna or dwale
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bel•la•don•na

(ˌbɛl əˈdɒn ə)

n.
1. Also called deadly nightshade. a poisonous plant, Atropa belladonna, of the nightshade family, having purplish red flowers and black berries.
[1590–1600; < Italian bella donna literally, fair lady]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deadly nightshade - perennial Eurasian herb with reddish bell-shaped flowers and shining black berriesdeadly nightshade - perennial Eurasian herb with reddish bell-shaped flowers and shining black berries; extensively grown in United States; roots and leaves yield atropine
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Atropa, genus Atropa - belladonna
2.deadly nightshade - poisonous perennial Old World vine having violet flowers and oval coral-red berriesdeadly nightshade - poisonous perennial Old World vine having violet flowers and oval coral-red berries; widespread weed in North America
genus Solanum, Solanum - type genus of the Solanaceae: nightshade; potato; eggplant; bittersweet
nightshade - any of numerous shrubs or herbs or vines of the genus Solanum; most are poisonous though many bear edible fruit
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
беладона
belladona
rulík zlomocný
galnebær
schwarze Tollkirsche
beladono
myrkkykoiso
maszlagos nadragulyanadragulya
ベラドンナ
solanum
vaistinė šunvyšnė
wolfskers
pokrzyk wilcza jagoda
beladonămătrăgună
ľuľkovec zlomocný
volčja češnja
велебиље
belladonna
белладонна

deadly nightshade

nTollkirsche f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Would he not suddenly sink into the earth, leaving a barren and blasted spot, where, in due course of time, would be seen deadly nightshade, dogwood, henbane, and whatever else of vegetable wickedness the climate could produce, all flourishing with hideous luxuriance?
"The brooding willow whispered to the yew; Beneath, the deadly nightshade and the rue, With immortelles self-woven into strange Funereal shapes, and horrid nettles grew.
"There are some on our list that clearly have lethal tendencies, like Deadly Nightshade and Hemlock.
Which poison is extracted from deadly nightshade? A Atropine B Digitalis C Nitropine D Mandrafin 2.
Which poison is extracted from deadly nightshade? Atropine Digitalis C Nitropine Mandrafin 2.
|That's because potatoes are related to deadly nightshade and the greenery contains the poisonous compounds solanines and glycoalkaloids.
FRIENDS OUR AT DUDLEY The poisonous deadly nightshade plant, or belladonna, which grows behind walls of the 11th century Dudley Castle in areas not accessible to the public, had an eye-opening use for medieval women.
Another deadly nightshade, belladonna, boosted the attractiveness of 18th century Italian ladies by darkening their eyes.
Not one to take rejection well, Deadly Nightshade cursed the prince to live as a hideous beast, unless he could find a maiden to fall in love with him.
Roedd Atropa bella-donna yno hefyd: codwarth ydi'r enw Cymraeg a Deadly Nightshade yn Saesneg, ac mae hwn wedi'i ei ddefnyddio i wenwyno pobl dros y canrifoedd.
Lycopersicon esculentum, as the tomato is also known, arrived in Great Britain at the end of the 16th century but was thought poisonous as it was a member of the deadly nightshade family, Solanaceae.
Deadly nightshade (black berries), climbing nightshade (red or black berries), poison ivy and poison sumac (white berries), and plants such as baneberry, doll's eyes, leopardsbane and a host of unfamiliar plants are best admired at a distance.