deadness


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dead

 (dĕd)
adj. dead·er, dead·est
1. Having lost life; no longer alive.
2. Marked for certain death; doomed: knew when he saw the soldiers that he was a dead man.
3.
a. Having the physical appearance of death: a dead pallor.
b. Lacking feeling or sensitivity; numb or unresponsive: Passersby were dead to our pleas for help.
c. Weary and worn-out; exhausted.
4.
a. Not having the capacity to live; inanimate or inert.
b. Not having the capacity to produce or sustain life; barren: dead soil.
5.
a. No longer in existence, use, or operation: a dead language.
b. No longer having significance or relevance: a dead issue.
c. Physically inactive; dormant: a dead volcano.
6.
a. Not commercially productive; idle: dead capital.
b. Not circulating or running; stagnant: dead water; dead air.
7.
a. Devoid of human or vehicular activity; quiet: a dead town.
b. Lacking all animation, excitement, or activity; dull: The party being dead, we left early.
8. Having no resonance. Used of sounds.
9. Having grown cold; having been extinguished: dead coals; a dead flame.
10. Lacking elasticity or bounce: That tennis ball is dead.
11.
a. Not working because of a fault or breakdown: The motor is dead. The phone is dead.
b. Not connected to a source of electric current: a dead wire.
c. Drained of electric charge; discharged: a dead battery.
12.
a. Sudden; abrupt: a dead stop.
b. Complete; utter: dead silence.
c. Exact; unerring: the dead center of a target.
13. Sports Out of play. Used of a ball.
n.
1. (used with a pl. verb) People who have died: respect for the dead.
2. The period exhibiting the greatest degree of intensity: the dead of winter; the dead of night.
adv.
1. Absolutely; altogether: You can be dead sure of my innocence.
2. Directly; exactly: There's a gas station dead ahead.
3. Suddenly: She stopped dead on the stairway.
Idioms:
dead and buried
No longer in use or under consideration: All past animosities are dead and buried now.
dead in the water
Unable to function or move: The crippled ship was dead in the water. With no leadership, the project was dead in the water.
dead to rights
In the very act of making an error or committing a crime: The police caught the thief dead to rights with my silverware.
dead to the world
Soundly asleep.
over my dead body
Used to express dramatic refusal.

[Middle English ded, from Old English dēad; see dheu- in Indo-European roots.]

dead′ness n.
Synonyms: dead, deceased, departed, late, extinct, lifeless
These adjectives all mean without life. Dead applies in general to whatever once had—but no longer has—physical life (a dead body; a dead leaf), but is also applied to function (a dead battery) and force or currency (a dead issue; a dead language). Deceased and departed are polite or euphemistic terms referring only to people: attended a memorial service for a recently deceased friend; looking at pictures of departed relatives. Late is also restricted to people and usually implies recent death: a gift in memory of her late husband. Extinct can refer to what has no living successors (extinct species such as the dodo) or to what is extinguished or inactive (an extinct volcano). Lifeless applies to what no longer has physical life (a lifeless body), to what does not support life (a lifeless planet), or to what lacks animation, spirit, or brightness (a lifeless performance; lifeless colors).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deadness - the quality of being unresponsive; not reacting; as a quality of people, it is marked by a failure to respond quickly or with emotion to people or events; "she began to recover from her numb unresponsiveness after the accident"; "in an instant all the deadness and withdrawal were wiped away"
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
frigidity, frigidness - sexual unresponsiveness (especially of women) and inability to achieve orgasm during intercourse
resistance - the degree of unresponsiveness of a disease-causing microorganism to antibiotics or other drugs (as in penicillin-resistant bacteria)
2.deadness - the physical property of something that has lost its elasticity; "he objected to the deadness of the tennis balls"
inelasticity - the lack of elasticity
3.deadness - the inanimate property of something that has died
inanimateness, lifelessness - not having life
Translations

deadness

[ˈdednɪs] Ninercia f, falta f de vida

deadness

n (of limbs)Taubheit f; (of colour)Langweiligkeit f; nothing compares with the deadness of Blackpool in winternichts ist so öde wie Blackpool im Winter
References in classic literature ?
So one beautiful still evening Dickon told the whole story, with all the thrilling details of the buried key and the robin and the gray haze which had seemed like deadness and the secret Mistress Mary had planned never to reveal.
But I've noticed that in these villages where the people lead a quiet life among the green pastures and the still waters, tilling the ground and tending the cattle, there's a strange deadness to the Word, as different as can be from the great towns, like Leeds, where I once went to visit a holy woman who preaches there.
I laughed: a sentiment of exquisite pleasure played over my nerves at the thought that "vives impressions" were likely to be created; it was the deadness, the sameness of life's daily ongoings that had hitherto been my bane; my blouse-clad "eleves" in the boys' seminary never stirred in me any "vives impressions" except it might be occasionally some of anger.
During the early part of my stay I had been struck by the contrast between the vitality of the climate and the deadness of the community.
In alluding just now to our system of education, I spoke of the deadness of its details.
Where Willarski saw deadness Pierre saw an extraordinary strength and vitality- the strength which in that vast space amid the snows maintained the life of this original, peculiar, and unique people.
There is still the same freedom from pain, the same deadness to all sensation where the suffering was most acute.
There's a deadness steals over me at times, that the kind of life favours and I don't like.
I shall be stronger, and keep the deadness off better, this way, than any way left open to me, sir.
After the deadness of the first game, the second was an explosion.
It is a passage which generates the catalogue of trees that opens Rossetti's "An Old-World Thicket," including the ominous "elm that dies in secret from the core"--suggesting that however delightful the wood may seem, there is deadness inside it (CP, 2:123-124).
He charges that Updike's narrators are guilty of the sin of sloth, medieval acedia, because they evince "apathy and indifference toward the good"; they possess "the spiritual dryness and deadness of the soul that has lost its hunger for God" ("Into the Void").