deadwood

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dead·wood

 (dĕd′wo͝od′)
n.
1. Dead wood, including fallen or standing trees, branches, and stumps.
2. One or more people or things considered as burdensome, superfluous, or serving no useful purpose: Management fired all the deadwood in the department as a cost-saving measure.
3. also dead wood Sports Fallen bowling pins that remain on the alley.
4. Nautical A timber or set of timbers helping to connect the keel of a vessel to the stem or the sternpost.

deadwood

(ˈdɛdˌwʊd)
n
1. (Forestry) dead trees or branches
2. informal a useless person; encumbrance
3. (Nautical Terms) nautical a filler piece between the keel and the stern of a wooden vessel

dead•wood

(ˈdɛdˌwʊd)

n.
1. dead branches or trees.
2. useless or extraneous persons or things.
3. a reinforcing construction located between the keel of a ship and the stem or sternpost.
4. bowling pins knocked down but not cleared from the alley.
[1720–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deadwood - a branch or a part of a tree that is deaddeadwood - a branch or a part of a tree that is dead
branch - a division of a stem, or secondary stem arising from the main stem of a plant
2.deadwood - someone or something that is unwanted and unneededdeadwood - someone or something that is unwanted and unneeded
redundance, redundancy - the attribute of being superfluous and unneeded; "the use of industrial robots created redundancy among workers"
Translations

deadwood

[ˈdedˌwʊd] N (= person) → persona f inútil; (= people) → gente f inútil; (= things) → cosas fpl inútiles
to get rid of the deadwood (in organization) → eliminar al personal inútil

deadwood

[ˈdɛdˌwʊd] n (also) (fig) → rami mpl secchi
References in classic literature ?
Twice my bearers missed their footing, and my heart ceased beating as we plunged toward instant death among the tangled deadwood beneath.
The history of the changes, which the elevated plains of Longwood and Deadwood have undergone, as given in General Beatson's account of the island, is extremely curious.