deaf-and-dumb


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deaf-and-dumb

adj
unable to hear or speak
n
(Physiology) a deaf person without speech
Usage: Using deaf-and-dumb or deaf-mute to refer to people without speech is considered outdated and offensive, and should be avoided. The phrase profoundly deaf is a suitable alternative in many contexts
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

deaf′-and-dumb′



adj. Offensive.
unable to hear and speak.
[1150–1200]
usage: See dumb.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.deaf-and-dumb - lacking the sense of hearing and the ability to speak
deaf - lacking or deprived of the sense of hearing wholly or in part
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

deaf-and-dumb

[ˈdefənˈdʌm] ADJ [person, alphabet] → sordomudo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

deaf-and-dumb

[ˈdɛfənˈdʌm] adj (person) → sordomuto/a; (language) → dei sordomuti
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

deaf-and-dumb

adj (ant) sordomudo
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chairing the opening of the First Regional Conference of the Arab Deaf-and-Dumb held in Tunis from September 6-7, he said that this strategy includes several programmes, with the participation of the civil society and organisations operating in the promotion of people with disabilities.
He robbed one 86-year-old frail and almost blind woman in Anniesland of pounds 180 and a deaf-and-dumb couple aged 72, in Seamore Street, all Glasgow in January l999.
Miriro subsequently appears in the dreams of a schoolboy, but, as one of the narrative voices acknowledges, "It is not easy to tell this story of a deaf-and-dumb woman married in her deafness, her inner silences eternal." This is very true, and it is a problem Hove never overcomes; indeed it is as a storyteller that he fails.