deal out


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

deal 1

 (dēl)
v. dealt (dĕlt), deal·ing, deals
v.tr.
1. To give out in shares or portions; apportion: a critic who deals out as much praise as blame. See Synonyms at distribute.
2. Games
a. To distribute (playing cards) among players.
b. To give (a specific card) to a player while so distributing.
3. To sell: deal prescriptions; deal cocaine.
4. To administer; deliver: dealt him a blow to the stomach.
v.intr.
1. To be occupied or concerned: a book that deals with the Middle Ages.
2. To behave in a specified way toward another or others; have transactions: deal honestly with competitors.
3. To take action with respect to someone or something: The committee will deal with this complaint.
4. Informal To cope: I can't deal with all of this arguing!
5. To do business; trade: dealing in diamonds.
6. Games To distribute playing cards.
7. Slang To buy and sell drugs, especially illegally.
8. Baseball To throw a pitch.
n.
1. The act or a round of apportioning or distributing.
2. Games
a. Distribution of playing cards.
b. The cards so distributed; a hand.
c. The right or turn of a player to distribute the cards.
d. The playing of one hand.
3. An indefinite quantity, extent, or degree: has a great deal of experience.
4.
a. An agreement, especially one that is mutually beneficial. See Synonyms at agreement.
b. A business transaction: struck a deal to buy a car dealership.
c. A legal contract: signed a deal to play for a new team.
5. Informal A sale favorable especially to the buyer; a bargain.
6. Informal Treatment received: a raw deal; a fair deal.
7. Informal The situation or background information regarding something: What's the deal with the new teacher?
Phrasal Verbs:
deal in
1. To include (someone) in a card game by dealing cards to that person.
2. To include (someone) in an enterprise or undertaking.
deal out
1. To exclude (someone) from a card game by not giving cards to that person.
2. To exclude (someone) from an enterprise or undertaking.

[Middle English delen, from Old English dǣlan, to divide, share; see dail- in Indo-European roots.]

deal 2

 (dēl)
n.
1.
a. A fir or pine board cut to standard dimensions.
b. Such boards or planks considered as a group.
2. Fir or pine wood.

[Middle English dele, from Middle Dutch and Middle Low German dele, plank.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.deal out - administer or bestow, as in small portionsdeal out - administer or bestow, as in small portions; "administer critical remarks to everyone present"; "dole out some money"; "shell out pocket money for the children"; "deal a blow to someone"; "the machine dispenses soft drinks"
give - transfer possession of something concrete or abstract to somebody; "I gave her my money"; "can you give me lessons?"; "She gave the children lots of love and tender loving care"
allot, portion, assign - give out; "We were assigned new uniforms"
reallot - allot again; "They were realloted additional farm land"
deal - distribute cards to the players in a game; "Who's dealing?"
apply, give - give or convey physically; "She gave him First Aid"; "I gave him a punch in the nose"
Translations

w>deal out

vt sepverteilen (→ to an +acc); cards(aus)geben (→ to +dat); to deal out punishmentStrafen verhängen; to deal out criticismKritik üben
References in periodicals archive ?
Well done to Anne Marie Connell, from Newcastle, who correctly worked out that you require seven "deal outs" to find the spectator's card when you start with 128 cards.
To find the spectator's chosen card when you do this trick with eight cards, you will need to do three "deal outs", with 16 cards four "deal outs", etc...
What is the number of "deal outs" required to find the spectator's card if you start with 128 cards?