dealbreaker


Also found in: Idioms.

dealbreaker

(ˈdiːlˌbreɪkə)
n
informal an issue that prevents an agreement from being reached: for the average marriage infidelity is a dealbreaker.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Juve goal would not be a dealbreaker, if Spurs can invest in one, since they already have the back-up
And tell her that if it it's a dealbreaker for her, she shouldn't be getting married.
This is an annoyance to be sure, but certainly not a dealbreaker.
There is trust to be earned from employees as well, and like any relationship, it can be the dealbreaker for success.
This could be a dealbreaker for many consumers as AMD has promised that it's Ryzen processors will work on the existing AM4 sockets till 2020.
For retired people, the lack of a regular salary may seem to be something of a stumbling block, but if you have capital available from other sources, such as the sale of an existing property or life savings, then it may not be the dealbreaker that you might think.
The one downside this restaurant has is that they don't accept cards, which is strange for a new business but there's a cashpoint less than 100 metres away so it wasn't a dealbreaker.
And that might be a dealbreaker for some buyers of Windows 10 S laptops, who will be faced with a difficult decision: Upgrade to Windows 10 Pro and gain the ability to install Chrome while giving up the security/manageability advantages that come with Windows 10 S, or put in an RMA ticket.
But Flynn said one provision could open the door to moving future employees to retirement plans that are less like pensions and more like 401(k)s, something he said could be a dealbreaker.
With good transport links to Leeds and Manchester, this can be a dealbreaker for people who work in the two cities, but want a cheaper or more rural alternative.
The secondary concern I have is a dealbreaker if it's true.