deare


Also found in: Wikipedia.

deare

(dɪə)
n
an act of damage or injury

deare

(dɪə)
n
(Animals) an archaic spelling of deer

deare

(dɪə)
n, adj
an archaic spelling of dear
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
Say Heav'nly Powers, where shall we find such love, Which of ye will be mortal to redeem Mans mortal crime, and just th' unjust to save, Dwels in all Heaven charitie so deare?
Authors' dedications bring first-person immediacy to Murray's arguments, as in this enticement by Robert Jones (active 1597-1615): "Deare friends ...
And yet for all, this vnregarding soile Vnlac't the line of his desired life, Denying mayntenance for his deare releife: Carelesse ere to preuent his exequy, Scarce deigning to shut vp his dying eye.
A 1632 Virginia law required a license to hunt wild pigs, but "any man be permitted to kill deare or other wild beasts or fowle in the common woods, forests, or rivers....
Kate brings a sense of ambiguity about her activities when she says: "My deare vnkind husband; I protest to thee I have playd this knauish part only to be witty" (5.1.231-32) to which Greenshield later responds with "A pox of your wit and your singing" (5.1.245).
As a poetic device, this model of rhetorical accommodation allowed the many readers of a single poem--as Gibbons writes in his reading of Donne's Holy Sonnet 'Show me deare Christ'--to 'forge a timeless unified worshipping body' in spite of the 'multiple individual readings of a single prayer-poem' that this body of readers would likely construe (p.
Those included ousted National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, 10 members of the White House Advisory Commission who resigned in protest, Ben Carson's top advisor Shermichael Singleton and White House National Security Council Director Craig Deare - the last of whom were fired for criticizing Trump.
In the 1920's, nearly 30 percent of Americans lived on farms (Kalbacher & DeAre, 1988).
Deare, John C; Zheng, Zhen; Xue, Charlie C L; Liu, Jian Ping; Shang, Jingsheng; Scott, Sean W; Littlejohn, Geoff.
Coridon "burnt in" Pastorella's "loue" and experienced a "sweet pleasing payne," causing him to "languish, and his deare life spend," like Mirabella's myriad deceased suitors (ix.10.3,6).
Her body, late the prison of sad paine, Now the sweet lodge of loue and deare delight: But she faire Lady ouercommen quight Of huge affection, did in pleasure melt, And in sweete rauishment pourd out her spright (45.3-7; 1590 ed.) While Spenser alters this ending in his 1596 edition in order to expand the pair's story into Book IV, (22) the 1590 Faerie Queene ends leaving the rest to our imagination as "those louers with sweet counteruayle, / Each other of loues bitter fruit despoile" (47.1-2).