deathward

deathward

(ˈdɛθwəd)
adj
having an inclination or disposition towards death
adv
in a manner that advances towards death
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Such pessimistic readings of the sexual politics at work in Gravity's Rainbow are typified by Herman and Weisenburger's recent argument that Pynchon's "liberated narrative techniques" ultimately fail to "connect to a politics, a practice, capable of addressing the alienated individualism, the thwarted prospects of nurturing and community, and the deathward trajectory of all the plots Gravity's Rainbow otherwise represents.
Through that lens, the Midwestern colonists are less harbingers of rewilding than doomed mariners sailing deathward through a hostile sea of civilization.
But at other times the poems more distinctly imagined their maker's real vanishing, the deathward drag to which we are all subject, and to these scenes Mark brought a combination of classical amplitude, wit, stoicism, and elegance that was all his own.
3.3) In Royal Palm: he meditates on man's direction in life, ever towards death: "[...] till our deathward breath is sealed -."
This deathward drift of the philosophy is something neither Mailer nor Brossard failed to see, though while the one put it in his books, the other sensed it in their author.
"Lord of Life, of lyres and laughter, Those about to die salute thee, At thy godlike fancy feeding men with bread and beasts with men, But for us the Fates point deathward In a thousand thumbs thrust downward, And the Dog of Hell is roaring through the lions in their den." I have seen, where a strange country Opened its secret plains about me, One great golden dome stand lonely with its golden image, one Seen afar, in strange fulfillment, Through the sunlit Indian summer That Apocalyptic portent that has clothed her with the Sun.
found [himself] saying to the assembled heads, "All plots tend to move deathward. This is the nature of plots.
When the capricious gods are calling deathward, like Hector, we must each stand alone.
Doesn't Jesus' death release us all from the downward, deathward spiral of violence Doesn't his resurrection show us that it is God's way to give life and to make things new
If after DeLillo--if not after Hitchcock or Melville--all plots lead deathward, are grave, is fiction that is not chiliastic missing the point?
Second, the narrative ends in a murder scene, because "All plots tend to move deathward" in crime fiction (26).
All deathward everything moves, ineluctably, irreversibly.